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Meaning of “reinvent” in the English Dictionary

"reinvent" in British English

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reinventverb [T]

uk   /ˌriː.ɪnˈvent/  us   /ˌriː.ɪnˈvent/
to produce something new that is based on something that already exists: The story of Romeo and Juliet was reinvented as a Los Angeles gangster movie.
reinvent yourself
to change your job and/or the way you look and behave so that you seem very different: He's one of those sportsmen who reinvent themselves as TV presenters.
(Definition of reinvent from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reinvent" in American English

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reinventverb [T]

 us   /ˌri·ɪnˈvent/
to change someone or something so much that the person or thing seems completely new: He promised to reinvent government if elected.
(Definition of reinvent from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"reinvent" in Business English

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reinventverb [T]

uk   us   /ˌriːɪnˈvent/
to change something in a basic way so that it works differently: It's all about reinventing the way we do business. They must face reality and reinvent their failing systems.
reinvent yourself
to change the way you behave or look so that people think of you differently: In marketing parlance, the company has reinvented itself with a new brand. After going bankrupt she reinvented herself as an artist.
reinvent the wheel
to waste time and money in developing something that already exists: I'm afraid we've wasted six years reinventing the wheel.
(Definition of reinvent from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“reinvent” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
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