Meaning of “reluctant” in the English Dictionary

"reluctant" in British English

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reluctantadjective

uk /rɪˈlʌk.tənt/ us /rɪˈlʌk.tənt/

C1 not willing to do something and therefore slow to do it:

[ + to infinitive ] I was having such a good time I was reluctant to leave.
Many parents feel reluctant to talk openly with their children.
She persuaded her reluctant husband to take a trip to Florida with her.

More examples

reluctantly
adverb uk /rɪˈlʌk.tənt.li/ us /rɪˈlʌk.tənt.li/

C1

She reluctantly agreed to step down as managing director.

(Definition of “reluctant” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reluctant" in American English

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reluctantadjective

us /rɪˈlʌk·tənt/

not wanting to do something and therefore slow to do it:

[ + to infinitive ] She had trouble sleeping but was reluctant to take sleeping pills.
reluctance
noun [ U ] us /rɪˈlʌk·təns/

The poll also showed a reluctance to accept higher taxes, particularly at the local level.
reluctantly
adverb us /rɪˈlʌk·tənt·li/

He reluctantly resigned.

(Definition of “reluctant” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)