remark Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “remark” in the English Dictionary

"remark" in British English

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remarkverb [T]

uk   /rɪˈmɑːk/  us   /-ˈmɑːrk/
B2 to give a ​spokenstatement of an ​opinion or ​thought: [+ (that)] Dr Johnson ​once remarked (that) "When a man is ​tired of London, he is ​tired of ​life." [+ that] He remarked that she was ​lookingthin.
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Phrasal verbs

remarknoun [C]

uk   /rɪˈmɑːk/  us   /-ˈmɑːrk/
B2 something that you say, giving ​youropinion about something or ​stating a ​fact: Her remarks on the ​employmentquestionled to a ​heateddiscussion. The ​children maderude remarks about the ​old man.
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(Definition of remark from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"remark" in American English

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 us   /rɪˈmɑrk/
to give a ​spokenstatement of an ​opinion or ​thought: [+ (that) clause] She remarked (that) she’d be ​home late. If you remark on something, you ​notice it and say something about it: [I] All his ​friends remarked on the ​change in him.
noun [C]  us   /rɪˈmɑrk/
I ​think if you ​read his remarks, you’ll ​find them very ​fair.
(Definition of remark from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “remark”
in Korean 발언…
in Arabic مُلاحَظة, تَعْليق…
in Malaysian komen…
in French remarque…
in Russian замечание…
in Chinese (Traditional) 說起, 評論說, 談論…
in Italian nota, osservazione…
in Turkish söz, lâf, beyan…
in Polish uwaga…
in Spanish observación, comentario…
in Vietnamese nhận xét…
in Portuguese comentário, observação…
in Thai ความเห็น…
in German die Bemerkung…
in Catalan comentari…
in Japanese 発言, 意見, コメント…
in Chinese (Simplified) 说起, 评论说, 谈论…
in Indonesian komentar…
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“remark” in British English

“remark” in American English

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