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Meaning of “represent” in the English Dictionary

"represent" in British English

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representverb

uk   /ˌrep.rɪˈzent/  us   /ˌrep.rɪˈzent/
  • represent verb (ACT FOR)

C2 [T] to ​speak, ​act, or be ​presentofficially for another ​person or ​people: They ​chose a ​famousbarrister to represent them in ​court. Union ​officials representing the ​teachersmet the ​government today. I ​sent my ​husband to represent me at the ​funeral. Women were well/​poorly represented at the ​conference (= there were many/few ​present).
[T] to be the Member of Parliament, or of ​Congress, etc. for a ​particulararea: Ed Smythe represents Barnet.
C2 [T] to be the ​person from a ​country, ​school, etc. that is in a ​competition: She was ​chosen to represent France at the Olympics.
formal to ​express or ​complain about something, to a ​person in ​authority: We represented ​ourgrievances/​demands to the ​boss.

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  • represent verb (DESCRIBE)

C2 [T] to show or ​describe something or someone: [+ -ing verb] The ​statue represents St. George ​killing the ​dragon. This new ​report represents the ​currentsituation in ​ourschools. He represents himself as an ​expert, but he ​knows nothing.
B2 [T] to be a ​sign or ​symbol of something: To many ​people the White House represents the ​identity of the United States.

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  • represent verb (BE)

B2 [L only + noun] to be the ​result of something, or to be something: This ​book represents ten ​years of ​thought and ​research. The new ​offer represented an ​increase of 10 ​percent on the ​previous one.

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(Definition of represent from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"represent" in American English

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representverb

 us   /ˌrep·rɪˈzent/
  • represent verb (ACT FOR)

[T] to ​speak, ​act, or be ​presentofficially for a ​person or ​group: His ​lawfirm is representing a ​dozen of the ​familiesinvolved in that ​disaster.
  • represent verb (DESCRIBE)

[T] to show or ​describe something, or to be a ​sign or ​symbol of something: The ​memorial represents the ​sacrifice of men and women who gave ​theirlives in ​war.
  • represent verb (BE)

[L] to be the ​result of something, or to be something: This represents ​years of ​work. China and India represent 40% of the world’s ​population.
representation
noun [U]  us   /ˌrep·rɪ·zenˈteɪ·ʃən, -zən-/
People too ​poor to ​pay for ​legal representation get a ​publicdefender.
(Definition of represent from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"represent" in Business English

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representverb [T]

uk   us   /ˌreprɪˈzent/
to speak for a ​person, ​organization, etc.: A ​delegation was in Japan last week to represent the ​industry in ​high-leveltradetalks. The ​union does not represent ​temporaryworkers.represent sb's interests/views We need an ​organisation to represent the ​interests of the whole ​workforce.
LAW to ​defend someone in a ​court of ​law: He's an eminent ​taxlawyer and has represented several ​topcompanies in ​high-profilecases.
to be something or to be ​equal to something: This ​sum of ​money represents a large ​percentage of our ​workingcapital. The ​removal of ​tradebarriers represents an important ​marketopportunity for this ​organisation.
GRAPHS & CHARTS if a ​part of a ​picture or ​drawing represents something, it ​shows a particular ​piece of ​information: Each ​line in the ​diagram represents a ​businessrelationship.
(Definition of represent from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“represent” in Business English

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