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Meaning of “residential” in the English Dictionary

"residential" in British English

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residentialadjective

uk   /ˌrez.ɪˈden.ʃəl/ us   /ˌrez.əˈden.ʃəl/
B2 A residential road, area, etc. has only private houses, not offices and factories.
C2 A residential job, position, course, etc. is one for which you live at the same place where you work or study.
relating to where you live or have lived: You must satisfy the residential qualifications to get a work permit.

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(Definition of residential from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"residential" in American English

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residentialadjective [not gradable]

us   /ˌrez·ɪˈden·tʃəl/
of or relating to houses where people live rather than to places where they work: Glen Oaks is a residential neighborhood.
(Definition of residential from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"residential" in Business English

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residentialadjective

uk   /ˌrezɪˈdenʃəl/ us  
PROPERTY a residential area or building is where people live: The business was disturbing people in the usually quiet residential area. There were 681 residential units available for rent in that area alone.
COMMERCE relating to homes, rather than businesses: The average annual bill for residential customers fell by $5. They are the state's second largest residential insurer.
involving living in a place, as well as studying or working there: residential course
(Definition of residential from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“residential” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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