restore Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “restore” in the English Dictionary

"restore" in British English

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restoreverb [T]

uk   /rɪˈstɔːr/  us   /-ˈstɔːr/
B2 to ​return something or someone to an ​earlier good ​condition or ​position: The ​badlyneglectedpaintings have all been ​carefully restored. After a ​week in ​bed, she was ​fully restored tohealth (= she ​felthealthy again). The ​formerleader was today restored topower in the first ​freeelections for 20 ​years.C1 If you restore a ​quality or ​ability that someone has not had for a ​longtime, you make it ​possible for them to have that ​quality or ​ability again: Doctors have restored his ​sight. The ​government is ​trying to restore ​public confidence in ​itsmanagement of the ​economy. to ​bring back into use something that has been ​absent for a ​period of ​time: Some ​people are in ​favour of restoring ​capitalpunishment for ​murderers. formal to give something that has been ​lost or ​stolen back to the ​person it ​belongs to: The ​painting was restored toits rightfulowner.
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(Definition of restore from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"restore" in American English

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restoreverb [T]

 us   /rɪˈstɔr, -ˈstoʊr/
to ​return something or someone to an ​earliercondition or ​position, or to ​bring something back into ​existence: Power ​companycrews were ​workingyesterday to restore ​electricalservice to ​homes in the ​area. Surgeons restored the ​sight in her ​righteye.
(Definition of restore from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"restore" in Business English

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restoreverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈstɔːr/
to ​return something to an earlier good ​condition or ​position: The ​bigunions want the ​historiclink between basic ​statepensions and ​averageearnings restored.restore sth to sth If you take totally ​abandonedland, you could restore it to ​profitability after about three ​years. The ​company was restored to ​financialhealth.
to make it possible for someone to have a ​quality or ​ability again that they have not had for a ​longtime: restore confidence/faith The ​move by the US Federal Reserve this week to ​cutinterestrates has restored a lot of ​publicconfidence. The ​firm is ​battling to restore its ​reputation after the ​scandal.
to give something that has been ​lost or taken, or ​money that is ​owed, back to the ​person it belongs to: The painting was restored to its rightful ​owner. The ​banks have restored the company's ​finances by ​deferringrepayment of £588m of ​loans and ​interest. If the ​economypicks up, he expects to restore ​funding to road ​projects.
to ​bring back into use something that has been ​absent for a ​period of ​time: We need to restore ​competition to the operating-system and ​browsermarkets. restore ​growth/​profitability
(Definition of restore from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“restore” in Business English

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