retrenchment Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “retrenchment” in the English Dictionary

"retrenchment" in British English

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retrenchmentnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /rɪˈtrentʃ.mənt/
a ​situation in which a ​government, etc. ​spends less or ​reducescosts Australian English a ​situation in which someone ​losestheirjob because ​theiremployer does not need them: The ​downturn in ​business has ​resulted in many retrenchments.
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(Definition of retrenchment from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"retrenchment" in Business English

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retrenchmentnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /rɪˈtrentʃmənt/
MANAGEMENT, FINANCE the ​act of ​spending less or ​reducingcosts: The ​closures will be the first ​substantial retrenchment at the ​store for 10 ​years. The ​big retrenchment in ​aerospacemanufacturing in the early 1990s eventually ​infected the entire ​stateeconomy. Businesses are going for ​growth, after the retrenchment of recent ​years.
Australian English HR, WORKPLACE the ​act of ​removing a ​worker from a ​job as a way of ​saving the ​cost of ​employing them: Some ​firms are using retrenchments as a ​costreductionmeasure. This resulted in the retrenchment of 40,000 ​public servants.
(Definition of retrenchment from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “retrenchment”
in Chinese (Simplified) 削减费用, 紧缩开支, 裁减工人…
in Chinese (Traditional) 削減費用, 緊縮開支, 裁減工人…
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“retrenchment” in Business English

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