rework Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “rework” in the English Dictionary

"rework" in British English

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reworkverb [T]

uk   /ˌriːˈwɜːk/  us   /ˌriːˈwɝːk/
to change a speech or a piece of writing in order to improve it or make it more suitable for a particular purpose: She reworked her speech for a younger audience.
reworking
noun [C] uk   /ˌriːˈwɜː.kɪŋ/  us   /ˌriːˈwɝː.kɪŋ/
His latest book is a reworking of material from his previous short stories.
(Definition of rework from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rework" in American English

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reworkverb [T]

 us   /riˈwɜrk/
to change a speech, other writing, or a drawing to make it better or more suitable for a particular purpose
(Definition of rework from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"rework" in Business English

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reworkverb [T]

uk   us   /ˌriːˈwɜːk/
to make changes to calculations of costs, prices, etc. in order to make them more accurate: The Irish low-cost airline will present a reworked subsidy package as part of its appeal against the ruling. We are currently reworking the entire project budget.
to make changes to a law, document, etc. in order to make it more effective, suitable, or accurate: rework a bill/law If the reworked bill is approved, it will come back for an Assembly vote.
PRODUCTION to make changes to a machine or piece of equipment in order to correct faults in it: The reworked cars will be tested over the next four weeks.
(Definition of rework from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“rework” in British English

“rework” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
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by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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