Meaning of “rhetoric” in the English Dictionary

"rhetoric" in English

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rhetoricnoun [ U ]

uk /ˈret.ər.ɪk/ us /ˈret̬.ɚ.ɪk/

speech or writing intended to be effective and influence people:

How far the president will be able to translate his campaign rhetoric into action remains to be seen.
I was swayed by her rhetoric into donating all my savings to the charity.

specialized language the study of the ways of using language effectively

disapproving clever language that sounds good but is not sincere or has no real meaning:

In reply to the question, he just produced a lot of empty (= meaningless) rhetoric.

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(Definition of “rhetoric” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rhetoric" in American English

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rhetoricnoun [ U ]

us /ˈret̬·ər·ɪk/

speech or writing that is effective and persuasive

literature Rhetoric is also the art of speaking and writing effectively, or the study of this art.

rhetorical
adjective us /rɪˈtɔr·ɪ·kəl, -ˈtɑr-/

(Definition of “rhetoric” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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rhetoric

We should not allow the gap between our rhetoric and what we are actually prepared to argue for as politicians to open up too widely.
No doubt the rhetoric will continue.
The constant refrain that economic and social success can only be achieved by carrying out structural reforms is looking increasingly like empty rhetoric.
We must not only organise formal sittings characterised by high-flying rhetoric, but must also make things happen from day to day.
As you will appreciate, political rhetoric is not always helpful, but you all know how committed we are to securing a satisfactory outcome to the case.
All rhetoric about security should focus on the basic standards governing controls, surveillance, prohibited articles and security agents on board aircraft.
If such an elementary requirement as to ensure that people are fed cannot even be met, the rhetoric on development is not worth much.
Talking about equality between men and women in the world of work today is not, and must not be, merely an exercise in rhetoric.
Are we just writing rhetoric?
Now, however, we must move on a stage from merely engaging in rhetoric, whereupon it becomes a question of hard facts: money, agriculture and ancient border conflicts.