ring Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “ring” in the English Dictionary

"ring" in British English

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ringnoun

uk   us   /rɪŋ/

ring noun (CIRCLE)

B2 [C] a ​circle of any ​material, or any ​group of things or ​people in a ​circularshape or ​arrangement: The ​gameinvolvedthrowingmetal rings over a ​stick. The ​childrensat in a ring around the ​teacher.A2 [C] a ​circularpiece of ​jewellerywornespecially on ​yourfinger: He ​bought her a ​diamond/​emerald, etc. ring (= a ring with a ​jewelattached to it). [C] a ​group of ​people who ​help each other, often ​secretly and in a way that is to ​theiradvantage: a ​drug ring a ​spy ring
See also
[C] (US usually element) a ​circularpiece of ​material often made of ​metal that can be ​heated in ​order to be used for ​cooking: a ​gas ring an ​electric ring [C] a ​specialarea where ​peopleperform or ​compete: a ​boxing ring The ​horsestrotted round the ring.
See also
rings [plural] two round ​handles at the ​ends of two ​longropes that ​hang from the ​ceiling and are used in gymnastics
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ring noun (PHONE)

A2 [S] mainly UK (US usually and UK also call) the ​act of making a ​phone call to someone: I'll give you a ring ​tomorrow.

ring noun (SOUND)

B2 [C] the ​sound a ​bell makes: There was a ring at the ​door. He gave a ring at the ​door.

ringverb

uk   us   /rɪŋ/

ring verb (PHONE)

A2 [I or T] (rang, rung) mainly UK (US usually and UK also call) to make a ​phone call to someone: I ring ​homeonce a ​week to ​tell my ​parents I'm ​okay. There's been an ​accident - can you ring for an ​ambulance? The ​boss rang (in) to say he'll be back at 4.30.UK I rang round the ​airlines (= called many of them) to ​find out the ​cheapestprice. Why don't you ring (up) Simon and ​ask him to the ​party?
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ring verb (MAKE SOUND)

B1 [I or T] (rang, rung) to (​cause to) make the ​sound of a ​bell: The ​doorbell/​phone rang. Anne's ​alarmclock rang for ​half an ​hour before she ​woke. I rang the ​bell but nobody came to the ​door. My ​head is/My ​ears are still ringing (= are ​full of a ringing ​noise) from the ​sound of the ​militaryband.
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ring verb (CIRCLE)

[T] (ringed, ringed) to ​surround something: Armed ​police ringed the ​hijackedplane. The ​harbour is ​dangerous - it's ringed by/withrocks and ​reefs. UK [T] (ringed, ringed) to ​draw a ​circle around something: Students should ring the ​correctanswers in ​pencil. [T] (ringed, ringed) to put a ring on something, ​especially an ​animal: We ringed the ​birds (= put rings around ​theirlegs) so that we could ​identify them ​later.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"ring" in American English

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ringnoun

 us   /rɪŋ/

ring noun (CIRCLE)

[C] a ​circularpiece, esp. of ​jewelryworn on a ​finger: a ​goldwedding ring [C] A ring is also any ​group of things or ​people in a ​circularshape or ​arrangement: a ​key ring A ring of ​peoplejoinedhands in the ​dance. earth science [C] A ring is also the ​smallpieces of ​matter that ​circle around a ​planet.

ring noun (SPACE)

a ​space where ​peopleperform or ​compete that is separated from, and usually at the ​center of, the ​space where ​people can ​watch the ​event: a ​boxing ring a one-ring/three-ring ​circus

ring noun (GROUP)

[C] a ​group of ​people who ​work together, often ​secretly in ​criminalactivities: a ​spy ring

ring noun (SOUND)

[C usually sing] a ​telephonecall: I’ll give Sophia a ring.

ringverb

 us   /rɪŋ/

ring verb (SOUND)

[I/T] (past tense rang  /ræŋ/ , past participle rung  /rʌŋ/ ) to make a ​sound, esp. the ​sound made when ​metal is ​hit, or to ​cause a ​bell to make a ​sound: [I] The ​telephone rang. [T] I rang the ​doorbell but nobody ​answered. [I] My ​ears are ringing (= I ​hear a ​noise that is not really there).

ring verb (CIRCLE)

[T] to ​surround something: The ​island is ringed with ​rocks.
ringer
noun [C usually sing]  us   /ˈrɪŋ·ər/
I ​turned the ringer off on my ​phone so I could get some ​sleep.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"ring" in Business English

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ringverb

uk   us   /rɪŋ/ (rang, rung)
[I or T] ( UK also ring up) COMMUNICATIONS to ​call someone on the ​phone: If he's out of the ​office, ring his ​mobile. I rang a few ​stockbrokers to see what they would ​recommend. When someone rings up, we can make provisional ​approval for a ​loan within five ​minutes.ring (sb) about/for sth The ​price of ​insurance can depend on when you ring for a ​quote.
See also
[I] COMMUNICATIONS if a ​phone rings, it makes a ​sound because someone is ​calling: The ​phone was ringing. My ​phone didn't ring all morning.
ring the (cash) register (also (cash) registers are ringing) used to describe a ​situation in which there are a lot of ​sales or a ​bigprofit is being made: Consumers are ringing ​cashregisters at a ​steadypace, ​incomes are on the ​rise, and ​exports are ​rocketing. Cash ​registers were ringing across the ​nation over the Christmas ​period.
ring off the hook US COMMUNICATIONS if a ​phone is ringing off the ​hook, it rings a lot of ​times: His ​phone has been ringing off the ​hook with ​calls from ​people who want him to do ​work for them.

ringnoun

uk   us   /rɪŋ/
a ​group of ​peopleworking together ​illegally: a drugs/​smuggling/​betting ring
STOCK MARKET the ​part of a ​stockexchange or commodityexchange (= ​place where ​oil, metal, ​grain, coffee, etc. are ​traded) where the ​buying and ​sellingtakesplace: Some ​commoditymarkets still have a ​tradingfloor or ring.
See also
give sb a ring UK informal COMMUNICATIONS to ​call someone on the ​phone: If we can be of any further ​assistance please give us a ring.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“ring” in Business English

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