ring Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “ring” in the English Dictionary

"ring" in British English

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ringnoun

uk   /rɪŋ/  us   /rɪŋ/
  • ring noun (CIRCLE)

B2 [C] a circle of any material, or any group of things or people in a circular shape or arrangement: The game involved throwing metal rings over a stick. The children sat in a ring around the teacher.
A2 [C] a circular piece of jewellery worn especially on your finger: He bought her a diamond/emerald, etc. ring (= a ring with a jewel attached to it).
[C] a group of people who help each other, often secretly and in a way that is to their advantage: a drug ring a spy ring
See also
[C] (US usually element) a circular piece of material often made of metal that can be heated in order to be used for cooking: a gas ring an electric ring
[C] a special area where people perform or compete: a boxing ring The horses trotted round the ring.
See also
rings [plural]
two round handles at the ends of two long ropes that hang from the ceiling and are used in gymnastics

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ringverb

uk   /rɪŋ/  us   /rɪŋ/
  • ring verb (PHONE)

A2 [I or T] (rang, rung) mainly UK (US usually and UK also call) to make a phone call to someone: I ring home once a week to tell my parents I'm okay. There's been an accident - can you ring for an ambulance? The boss rang (in) to say he'll be back at 4.30.UK I rang round the airlines (= called many of them) to find out the cheapest price. Why don't you ring (up) Simon and ask him to the party?

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  • ring verb (MAKE SOUND)

B1 [I or T] (rang, rung) to (cause to) make the sound of a bell: The doorbell/phone rang. Anne's alarm clock rang for half an hour before she woke. I rang the bell but nobody came to the door. My head is/My ears are still ringing (= are full of a ringing noise) from the sound of the military band.

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  • ring verb (CIRCLE)

[T] (ringed, ringed) to surround something: Armed police ringed the hijacked plane. The harbour is dangerous - it's ringed by/with rocks and reefs.
UK [T] (ringed, ringed) to draw a circle around something: Students should ring the correct answers in pencil.
[T] (ringed, ringed) to put a ring on something, especially an animal: We ringed the birds (= put rings around their legs) so that we could identify them later.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"ring" in American English

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ringnoun

 us   /rɪŋ/
  • ring noun (CIRCLE)

[C] a circular piece, esp. of jewelry worn on a finger: a gold wedding ring
[C] A ring is also any group of things or people in a circular shape or arrangement: a key ring A ring of people joined hands in the dance.
earth science [C] A ring is also the small pieces of matter that circle around a planet.
  • ring noun (SPACE)

a space where people perform or compete that is separated from, and usually at the center of, the space where people can watch the event: a boxing ring a one-ring/three-ring circus
  • ring noun (GROUP)

[C] a group of people who work together, often secretly in criminal activities: a spy ring
  • ring noun (SOUND)

[C usually sing] a telephone call: I’ll give Sophia a ring.

ringverb

 us   /rɪŋ/
  • ring verb (SOUND)

[I/T] (past tense rang  /ræŋ/ , past participle rung  /rʌŋ/ ) to make a sound, esp. the sound made when metal is hit, or to cause a bell to make a sound: [I] The telephone rang. [T] I rang the doorbell but nobody answered. [I] My ears are ringing (= I hear a noise that is not really there).
  • ring verb (CIRCLE)

[T] to surround something: The island is ringed with rocks.
ringer
noun [C usually sing]  us   /ˈrɪŋ·ər/
I turned the ringer off on my phone so I could get some sleep.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"ring" in Business English

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ringverb

uk   us   /rɪŋ/ (rang, rung)
[I or T] ( UK also ring up) COMMUNICATIONS to call someone on the phone: If he's out of the office, ring his mobile. I rang a few stockbrokers to see what they would recommend. When someone rings up, we can make provisional approval for a loan within five minutes.ring (sb) about/for sth The price of insurance can depend on when you ring for a quote.
See also
[I] COMMUNICATIONS if a phone rings, it makes a sound because someone is calling: The phone was ringing. My phone didn't ring all morning.
ring the (cash) register (also (cash) registers are ringing)
used to describe a situation in which there are a lot of sales or a big profit is being made: Consumers are ringing cash registers at a steady pace, incomes are on the rise, and exports are rocketing. Cash registers were ringing across the nation over the Christmas period.
ring off the hook US
COMMUNICATIONS if a phone is ringing off the hook, it rings a lot of times: His phone has been ringing off the hook with calls from people who want him to do work for them.

ringnoun

uk   us   /rɪŋ/
a group of people working together illegally: a drugs/smuggling/betting ring
STOCK MARKET the part of a stock exchange or commodity exchange (= place where oil, metal, grain, coffee, etc. are traded) where the buying and selling takes place: Some commodity markets still have a trading floor or ring.
See also
give sb a ring UK informal
COMMUNICATIONS to call someone on the phone: If we can be of any further assistance please give us a ring.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“ring” in Business English

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