rise Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “rise” in the English Dictionary

"rise" in British English

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riseverb

uk   us   /raɪz/ (rose, risen)

rise verb (MOVE UP)

B1 [I] to ​moveupwards: The ​balloon rose ​gently (up) into the ​air. At 6 a.m. we ​watched the ​sun rise (= ​appear and ​moveupwards in the ​sky). New ​buildings are rising (= being ​built)throughout the ​city.figurative Murmurs of ​disapproval rose from (= came from) the ​crowd. [I] to ​stand, ​especially after ​sitting: She rose from her ​chair to ​welcome us. He rose to hisfeet to ​deliver his ​speech. [I] formal to get out of ​bed: My ​grandfather rises at five every ​morning to do his ​exercises. [I] specialized geography If a ​river rises ​somewhere, it first comes out of the ​ground there: The River Cam rises in/at a ​place called Ashwell.
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rise verb (INCREASE)

B2 [I] to ​increase: Inflation is rising at/by 2.1 ​percent a ​month. The ​wind/​storm is rising (= ​beginning to get ​stronger). [I] When ​emotions, etc. rise, they ​start to ​increase: Tempers are rising (= ​people are ​becomingangry). My ​spirits rise (= I ​feelhappier)whenever I ​think of my ​friends. She ​feltpanic and ​terror rise in her ​whenever she ​thought of the ​future. His ​voice rose (= ​becamelouder or ​higher) as he got ​angry.
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rise verb (BECOME SUCCESSFUL)

C2 [I] to ​becomeimportant, ​successful, or ​powerful: After a ​longcareer with the ​company, she has risen to the ​position of ​chiefexecutive. He rose to ​power as the ​countryemerged from ​itsfinancialcrisis. She ​quickly rose through the ​ranks to ​becomehead of ​marketing. The ​singer has risen fromhumbleorigins to ​become one of the most ​successfulentertainers of all ​time.

rise verb (BECOME HIGHER)

[I] to ​becomehigher: The ​ground rises over there. The ​castle is ​built on rising ​ground (= ​groundhigher than ​areas around it). You can ​see the Alps rising (= ​showing as a ​higherarea) in the ​distance/above the ​clouds. [I, I] If ​bread or dough (= a ​softuncookedmixture used for making ​bread) rises, it ​becomesbigger because of the ​action of yeast (= a ​fungus used in ​beer and ​bread making): Leave the ​doughsomewherewarm to rise.
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rise verb (BE OPPOSED TO)

[I usually + adv/prep] (of a ​group of ​people) to ​begin to ​oppose or ​fight a ​badgovernment or ​ruler: The ​people rose (up) against the ​oppressor/​tyrant/​dictator.

rise verb (STOP WORK)

[I] formal If ​parliament or a ​court rises, it ​stopswork: Parliament/The ​court rose at 6 p.m.
Phrasal verbs

risenoun

uk   us   /raɪz/

rise noun (INCREASE)

B2 [C] an ​increase: a ​suddentemperature rise a 5 ​percent rise ininflation August has ​seen a ​large rise in the ​number of ​unemployed.
See also
on the rise increasing: Police say that ​youthcrime is on the rise again.
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rise noun (MOVEMENT UP)

C2 [S] the ​process of ​becoming very ​famous, ​powerful, or ​popular: Her ​rapid rise tofame/​power/​popularity, etc. ​meant that she made many ​enemies.
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rise noun (SLOPE/HILL)

[C] a ​smallhill or ​slope: The ​castle is ​built on a ​slight rise above the ​town.
(Definition of rise from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rise" in American English

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riseverb

 us   /rɑɪz/ (past tense rose  /roʊz/ , past participle risen  /ˈrɪz·ən/ )

rise verb (MOVE UP)

[I] to move up from a ​lower to a ​higherposition, or to ​becomehigher: Smoke rose from the ​campfire. The ​trail rises ​gently to the ​top of the ​ridge. We ​watched the ​sun rise over the ​bay. New ​buildings are rising (= ​becominghigher as they are ​built)throughout the ​city. On a ​clearday, you can ​see the ​mountains rising (= ​appearing high) in the ​distance. [I] To rise is also to ​stand up: She rose to ​welcome us. [I] To rise is also to get out of ​bed, esp. in the ​morning.

rise verb (INCREASE)

[I] to ​become more or ​greater in ​amount, ​size, or ​degree; ​increase: Real ​estateprices have risen ​rapidly. The ​temperature rose to 80° by ​midday. Our ​hopes rose when the ​doctors told us that she was ​conscious and ​alert. A ​murmur rose from the ​crowd (= ​began to be ​heard). [I] To rise is also to move into a more ​importantrank or ​position: He rose to ​fame in the 1940s.

rise verb (FIGHT)

[I always + adv/prep] to ​begin to ​oppose or ​fight (esp. a ​badgovernment or ​ruler) as a ​group: He ​urged his ​followers to rise up against the ​oppressiveregime.

risenoun

 us   /rɑɪz/

rise noun (SOMETHING THAT MOVES UP)

[C] a ​smallhill or ​slope: The ​house is ​built on a rise.
(Definition of rise from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"rise" in Business English

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riseverb [I]

uk   us   /raɪz/ (rose, risen)
to ​increase in ​number, ​amount, or ​value: As ​growth becomes ​embedded, ​interestrates rise. Gold ​bullion for ​delivery in December rose $1.20 an ​ounce to $400 an ​ounce. rise ​sharply/dramatically/​steadily, etc.rise by sth Retail ​salesvolume rose by 7.2% in the 12 months to June.rise to sth The ​joblessrate rose to 4.7% in Japan in September.
WORKPLACE to ​move up to a more important ​position in an ​organization: Those who rise to the ​top in ​public affairs ​work can expect ​socialrecognition.rise through sth Mr Reed rose quickly through the ​bank, becoming ​head of the ​corporatefinancedepartment in 2010.rise through the ranks She rose through the ​companyranks, becoming ​generalmanager in 2009.
rise to the challenge/occasion to show that you can ​deal with a difficult ​situation successfully: All eyes are now on the ​oilcompanies to see if they can rise to the ​challenge and get the ​fuel out quickly.

risenoun

uk   us   /raɪz/
[C] an ​increase in ​number, ​amount, or ​value: a rise in sth The ​strongprofitsprompted a 64% rise in the ​dividend. asharp/dramatic/​small rise Commodities ​analystsforecast a rise of around 3% aprice/​rate rise
[C] UK (US raise) HR, WORKPLACE an ​increase in ​salary or ​wages: I ​think you should ask the ​boss for a rise. Postal ​workers have ​cut a ​paydeal giving them a basic rise of 3.3%. He will receive a pay rise when he ​joins the ​board.
[S] the ​process of becoming more important or powerful: Thanks to the rise ofe-commerce, many ​firms are embracing the ​internet for many of their ​activities. the ​meteoric rise of the ​internet as a ​politicaltool
on the rise if something is on the rise, it is ​increasing: Interviews by ​videoconference are on the rise.
(Definition of rise from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“rise” in Business English

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