Meaning of “rival” in the English Dictionary

"rival" in British English

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rivalnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈraɪ.vəl/ us /ˈraɪ.vəl/

C1 a person, group, etc. competing with others for the same thing or in the same area:

He beat his closest/nearest rival by 20 marks.
The companies produce rival versions of the toy.

More examples

  • The company has decided not to go through with the takeover of its smaller rival.
  • The airline admitted being involved in a dirty tricks campaign to win customers from their rival.
  • She hired an assassin to eliminate her rival.
  • Big supermarkets can undercut all rivals, especially small high-street shops.
  • They beat several other rivals for the contract.

rivalverb [ T ]

uk /ˈraɪ.vəl/ us /ˈraɪ.vəl/ -ll- or US usually -l-

(Definition of “rival” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rival" in American English

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rivalnoun [ C ]

us /ˈrɑɪ·vəl/

a person, group, or organization competing with others for the same thing or in the same area:

rivalverb [ T ]

us /ˈrɑɪ·vəl/

to equal or be as good as:

No computer can rival a human brain.

(Definition of “rival” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"rival" in Business English

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rivalnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈraɪvəl/ us

a person, company, product, etc. competing with others for the same thing or in the same area:

The strong pound will leave large sections of British manufacturing uncompetitive against rivals in the rest of Europe.
rival for sth They are rivals for the top job.
rival to sb/sth Linux is an operating system and thus a rival to Windows.
your main/closest/biggest rival

rivaladjective [ before noun ]

uk /ˈraɪvəl/ us

competing with other people, companies, products, etc. for the same thing or in the same area:

a rival company/firm
a rival bid/offer
While they are more expensive than rival products, she said the quality makes the price worth it.
Any rival bidder will have to move quickly and pay considerably more.

rivalverb [ T ]

uk /ˈraɪvəl/ us UK -ll-, US -l-

to be as good as other similar people, companies, products, etc.:

In the Algarve, citrus farming is expanding rapidly and the fruit rivals anything Spain can produce.
Electronic marketplaces can offer a reach and efficiency that physical markets cannot rival.
rival sb/sth as sth China could eventually rival Japan as the most lucrative luxury market in the world.

(Definition of “rival” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)