rock Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “rock” in the English Dictionary

"rock" in British English

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rocknoun

uk   /rɒk/  us   /rɑːk/
  • rock noun (STONE)

B1 [C or U] the ​drysolidpart of the earth's ​surface, or any ​largepiece of this that ​sticks up out of the ​ground or the ​sea: Mountains and ​cliffs are ​formed from rock. The ​boatstruck a rock ​outside the ​bay and ​sank.
[C] a ​piece of rock or ​stone: The ​demonstrators were ​hurling rocks at the ​police.
rocks [plural]
a ​line of ​largestonessticking up from the ​sea: The ​stormforced the ​ship onto the rocks.
[C] slang for a ​valuablestone used in ​jewellery, ​especially a ​diamond: Have you ​seen the ​size of the rock he gave her for ​theiranniversary?

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  • rock noun (MUSIC)

A2 [U] a ​type of ​popularmusic with a ​strong, ​loudbeat that is usually ​played with ​electricguitars and ​drums: a rock group a rock star

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rockverb

uk   /rɒk/  us   /rɑːk/
  • rock verb (MOVE)

C2 [I or T] to (​cause someone or something to) ​movebackwards and ​forwards or from ​side to ​side in a ​regular way: He ​picked up the ​baby and ​gently rocked her to ​sleep. If you rock back on that ​chair, you're going to ​break it.
[T] If a ​person or ​place is rocked by something such as an ​explosion, the ​force of it makes the ​person or ​placeshake: The ​explosion, which rocked the ​city, ​killed 300.

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  • rock verb (WEAR SUCCESSFULLY)

[T] slang to ​wear a ​particularstyle of ​clothing, etc. and ​look good or ​fashionable: There are ​celebrities over 40 ​yearsold who can still rock a ​tattoo.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of rock from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rock" in American English

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rocknoun

 us   /rɑk/
  • rock noun (STONE)

[C/U] a ​largemass of ​stone that ​sticks up out of the ​ground or the ​sea, or a ​separatepiece of ​stone: [U] This is some of the ​oldest rock on the earth’s ​surface. [C] Waves ​crashed against the rocks. [C] Bees ​poured into the ​neighborhood when ​boysthrew rocks at the ​hives.
[C/U] slang A rock is also a ​diamond or other ​jewel.
  • rock noun (MUSIC)

[U] (also rock-and-roll,  /ˌrɑk·ənˈroʊl/ , rock ’n’ roll) a ​type of ​popularmusic with a ​strongbeat, which is usually ​played with ​electricguitars and ​drums

rockverb [I/T]

 us   /rɑk/
to move something or ​cause something to move ​backward and ​forward or from ​side to ​side: [T] He rocked the ​baby to ​sleep. [I] If you rock back on that ​chair, you’re going to ​break it.
If a ​building or ​area rocks, it ​shakes it ​violently: [T] An ​earthquake rocked the ​downtownarea today.
If a ​person or ​place is rocked, it is ​surprised, ​upset, or ​excited: [T] The ​university was rocked by the ​scandal.
  • rock verb [I/T] (BE EXCELLENT)

to be ​extremely good: [I] She's such a ​greatrolemodel for ​young women – she really rocks!
(Definition of rock from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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