roll Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “roll” in the English Dictionary

"roll" in British English

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rollverb

uk   /rəʊl/  us   /roʊl/

roll verb (MOVE)

B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to (​cause something to) ​movesomewhere by ​turning over and over or from ​side to ​side: The ​vase rolled off the ​edge of the ​table and ​smashed. The ​dog rolled over onto ​its back. I rolled the ​wheel along the ​side of the ​road back to the ​car.B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​movesomewhereeasily and without ​suddenmovements: A ​tear rolled down his ​cheek. A ​wave of ​cigarettesmoke rolled towards me. The piano's on ​wheels, so we can roll it into the ​room. [I] If an ​aircraft or a ​ship rolls, it ​leans to one ​side and then to the other because of the ​wind or ​waves. [I] If a ​machine is rolling, it is ​operating: Just as the ​television camerasstarted rolling, it ​began to ​pour down with ​rain.C2 [T] If you roll ​youreyes, you ​move them so that you are ​looking up, to show that you ​consider someone or something ​stupid or ​silly: When he ​suggested they should ​buy a new ​car, she rolled her ​eyes indisbelief.
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roll verb (TURN OVER)

B1 [T usually + adv/prep] to (​cause something to) ​turn over onto itself to ​form the ​shape of a ​ball or a ​tube: He rolled the ​clay into a ​ball in his ​hands. As I got ​closer, the ​hedgehog rolled itself (up) into a ​ball. [T] to make a ​cigarette by ​wrapping a ​piece of ​paper around some ​tobacco [I or T, + adv/prep] to ​fold over a ​piece of ​clothing or ​material to make it ​shorter: We rolled back the ​carpet to ​see the ​floorboards.
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roll verb (SMOOTH)

[T] to make something ​smooth and ​flat: [+ obj + adj ] She ​borrowed a ​gardenroller to roll the ​grassflat. When you have rolled (out) the ​pastry, ​place it in a ​piedish.

roll verb (SOUND)

[I] to make a ​continuous, ​repeated, ​deepsound: The drums rolled as the ​acrobatwalked along the ​tightrope. [T] If you roll ​your r's, you ​pronounce them with ​yourtonguemovingquickly and ​repeatedly against the ​top of the ​mouth: When you ​speakSpanish you roll ​your r's.

rollnoun

uk   /rəʊl/  us   /roʊl/

roll noun (TUBE)

B2 [C] a ​piece of ​film, ​paper, or ​cloth that is rolled into the ​shape of a ​tube: a roll of ​carpet a ​toilet roll (= a roll of ​toiletpaper) [C] If a ​person or ​animal has rolls of ​fat on ​theirbody, he, she, or it is very ​fat: The ​dog had rolls of ​fat along ​itsneck.
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roll noun (BREAD)

B1 [C] (also bread roll) a ​small loaf of ​bread for one ​person: Would you like a roll and ​butter with ​yoursoup?UK I ​bought a cheese/​ham/​tuna roll (= a ​sandwich made with a roll) for ​lunch.

roll noun (LIST)

[C] an ​officiallist of ​names: Is ​yourname on the electoral roll (= the ​list of ​people who can ​vote)?take/call the roll mainly US If you take/​call the roll, you ​readaloud the ​names of all the ​people on the ​list to make ​certain that they are ​present: The ​teacher called the roll to ​see if any ​students were ​absent.

roll noun (MOVEMENT)

[C] an ​act of rolling on the ​ground: The ​dog went for a roll in the ​grass.a roll in the hay humorous sexualactivity that is ​quick and ​enjoyable and does not ​involveseriousfeelings: I wouldn't ​sacrifice my ​marriage for a roll in the ​hay with a ​waitress. [U] The roll of a ​ship or ​aircraft is ​itsmovement from ​side to ​side in the ​water or ​air.

roll noun (SOUND)

[C usually singular] a ​continuousrepeateddeepsound: a drum roll a ​deafening roll of ​thunder
(Definition of roll from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"roll" in American English

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rollverb

 us   /roʊl/

roll verb (MOVE)

[I/T] to move in a ​direction by ​turning over and over or by ​traveling on ​wheels, or to ​cause something to move in this way: [I] The ​coin rolled off the ​table. [T] I rolled the ​sparetire around to the ​side of the ​car. [I] Tears rolled down his ​cheeks. Bob rolled over (= ​turned his ​body while ​lying down) onto his ​stomach. [I/T] If you roll a ​carwindow up or down, you ​turn a ​handle or ​press a ​button that ​opens or ​closes the ​window.

roll verb (FORM ROUNDED SHAPE)

[T] to ​form something ​soft into a ​roundedshape: He rolled the ​clay into a ​ball. [M] She rolled up her ​pants so they wouldn’t get ​wet.

roll verb (SOUND)

[I/T] to make a ​continuousrepeatedsound: [I] Thunder rolled in the ​distance.

rollnoun

 us   /roʊl/

roll noun (LIST)

[C] an ​officiallist of ​names: a roll of ​eligiblevoters

roll noun (BREAD)

[C] a ​smallloaf of ​bread

roll noun (MOVEMENT)

[C/U] the ​movement of something in a ​direction by ​turning over and over or by ​traveling on ​wheels: [C] You have to ​allow for the roll of the ​ball when it ​lands after you ​hit it.

roll noun (SOUND)

[C usually sing] a ​continuousrepeatedsound: a ​drum roll

roll noun (ROUNDED SHAPE)

[C] a ​longpiece of something that ​bends, ​formed into a ​cylinder: a roll of ​film/ ​tape/​aluminumfoil [C] A roll is also a ​roundedmass of something: rolls of ​fat
Idioms
(Definition of roll from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"roll" in Business English

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rollverb

uk   us   /rəʊl/
roll off the assembly/production line to be ​produced in a ​factory: The new ​vehicles roll off the ​assemblyline in August. The company's first ​locally made ​vehicle will roll off the ​productionline within a ​year.
(Definition of roll from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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