sabotage Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “sabotage” in the English Dictionary

(Definition of sabotage from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"sabotage" in American English

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sabotageverb [T]

 us   /ˈsæb·əˌtɑʒ/
to intentionally damage or destroy property: Enemy agents had sabotaged the bridge. fig. The bombing was meant to sabotage the peace talks.
sabotage
noun [U]  us   /ˈsæb·əˌtɑʒ/
The explosion was not an accident, it was sabotage.
(Definition of sabotage from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"sabotage" in Business English

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sabotageverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈsæbətɑːʒ/
to intentionally damage or destroy something, for example equipment or a system, that belongs to someone else, so that it cannot be used: He claims the animal rights group sabotaged their vehicles and trailers.
to intentionally do something that stops someone from achieving what they want or stops something from developing as it should: At that time the western aid programs were believed to be attempts to sabotage the Russian economy.

sabotagenoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈsæbətɑːʒ/
damage done intentionally to something, for example equipment or a system, that belongs to someone else, so that it cannot be used: The oil giant said it averaged 221 oil spills in recent years, because of aging equipment and sabotage. industrial/economic sabotage
the act of intentionally trying to stop someone from achieving something or to stop something from developing: To prevent further sabotage of their fraud investigation, FBI agents moved quickly.
(Definition of sabotage from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“sabotage” in British English

“sabotage” in American English

“sabotage” in Business English

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