Meaning of “sabotage” in the English Dictionary

"sabotage" in American English

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sabotageverb [ T ]

us /ˈsæb·əˌtɑʒ/

to intentionally damage or destroy property:

Enemy agents had sabotaged the bridge.
fig. The bombing was meant to sabotage the peace talks.
sabotage
noun [ U ] us /ˈsæb·əˌtɑʒ/

The explosion was not an accident, it was sabotage.

(Definition of “sabotage” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"sabotage" in Business English

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sabotageverb [ T ]

uk /ˈsæbətɑːʒ/ us

to intentionally damage or destroy something, for example equipment or a system, that belongs to someone else, so that it cannot be used:

He claims the animal rights group sabotaged their vehicles and trailers.

to intentionally do something that stops someone from achieving what they want or stops something from developing as it should:

At that time the western aid programs were believed to be attempts to sabotage the Russian economy.

sabotagenoun [ U ]

uk /ˈsæbətɑːʒ/ us

damage done intentionally to something, for example equipment or a system, that belongs to someone else, so that it cannot be used:

The oil giant said it averaged 221 oil spills in recent years, because of aging equipment and sabotage.

the act of intentionally trying to stop someone from achieving something or to stop something from developing:

To prevent further sabotage of their fraud investigation, FBI agents moved quickly.

(Definition of “sabotage” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)