sacrifice Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “sacrifice” in the English Dictionary

"sacrifice" in British English

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sacrificeverb

uk   us   /ˈsæk.rɪ.faɪs/
  • sacrifice verb (GIVE UP)

C1 [T] to give up something that is ​valuable to you in ​order to ​help another ​person: Many women sacrifice ​interestingcareers fortheirfamilies.

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sacrificenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈsæk.rɪ.faɪs/
C1 the ​act of giving up something that is ​valuable to you in ​order to ​help someone ​else: We had to make sacrifices in ​order to ​pay for ​our children's ​education. They ​cared for ​theirdisabledson for 27 ​years, atgreatpersonal sacrifice.

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the ​act of ​killing an ​animal or ​person and ​offering them to a ​god or ​gods, or the ​animal, etc. that is ​offered: The ​peopleoffered a ​lamb on the ​altar as a sacrifice fortheirsins.
(Definition of sacrifice from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"sacrifice" in American English

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sacrificeverb

 us   /ˈsæk·rəˌfɑɪs/
  • sacrifice verb (GIVE UP)

[T] to give up something for something ​elseconsidered more ​important: He sacrificed his ​vacations to ​work on his ​book.
  • sacrifice verb (OFFER A LIFE)

[I/T] to ​offer the ​life of an ​animal or a ​person to a ​god or ​gods in the ​hope of ​pleasing them, usually as ​part of a ​ceremony

sacrificenoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈsæk·rəˌfɑɪs/
  • sacrifice noun [C/U] (OFFERING OF LIFE)

the ​act of ​offering the ​life of an ​animal or a ​person to a ​god or ​gods in the ​hope of ​pleasing them, or the ​animal or ​person that is ​offered: [U] animal/​ritual sacrifice
  • sacrifice noun [C/U] (GIVING UP SOMETHING)

the ​act of giving up something for something ​elseconsidered more ​important: [C] My ​parents made many sacrifices to ​pay for my ​collegeeducation.
(Definition of sacrifice from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"sacrifice" in Business English

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sacrificenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈsækrɪfaɪs/
something useful or important that you choose not to do or have, in ​order to have something that is more important: make sacrifices Most ​workers have made sacrifices to ​keep the ​company alive. The ​economy is ​starting to ​grow and, after six ​years of sacrifice, to ​deliverhigherincomes. Are the ​financialsavingsworth the personal sacrifice?

sacrificeverb [ T]

uk   us   /ˈsækrɪfaɪs/
to choose not to do or have something useful or important, in ​order to have something that is more important: We ​offerfreeadvice to older ​people on the best way of ​paying for ​carefees without sacrificing ​savings and other ​personalassets.sacrifice sth for sth I was prepared to sacrifice my ​career for my family and my ​personallife.sacrifice sth to do sth He sacrificed his ​position as ​CEO in ​order to ​keep the ​company going.
(Definition of sacrifice from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“sacrifice” in Business English

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