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Meaning of “saint” in the English Dictionary

"saint" in British English

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saintnoun

uk   /seɪnt/ /sənt/  us   /seɪnt/  /sənt/
C1 [C] (written abbreviation St) (the ​title given to) a ​person who has ​received an ​officialhonour from the ​Christian, ​especially the ​RomanCatholic, Church for having ​lived in a good and ​holy way. The ​names of saints are sometimes used to ​nameplaces and ​buildings: Saint Peter St Andrew's ​school Saint Paul's Cathedral
[C usually singular] a very good, ​kindperson: She must be a real saint to ​stay with him all these ​years. He has the ​patience of a saint with those ​kids.

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  • Saint John
  • Saint Andrew
  • St Philips Rd
  • a ​martyred saint
  • These ​bones are the ​relics of a 12th-century saint.
sainthood
noun [U] uk   /ˈseɪnt.hʊd/  us   /ˈseɪnt.hʊd/
saintliness
noun [U] uk   /ˈseɪnt.li.nəs/  us   /ˈseɪnt.li.nəs/
saintly
adjective uk   /ˈseɪnt.li/  us   /ˈseɪnt.li/
Her saintly ​mannerconcealed a ​deviousmind.
(Definition of saint from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"saint" in American English

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saintnoun [C]

 us   /seɪnt/ (abbreviation St.)
a ​holyperson, esp. one who has been ​officiallyhonored with this ​title by a ​Christianchurch: Elizabeth Seton was the first ​personborn in the US to be made a saint by the ​RomanCatholicChurch.
A saint is also a good, ​kind, and ​patientperson: His ​mother was a saint to everyone who ​knew her.
(Definition of saint from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“saint” in British English

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