seat Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “seat” in the English Dictionary

"seat" in British English

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seatnoun

uk   us   /siːt/

seat noun (FURNITURE)

A2 [C] a ​piece of ​furniture or ​part of a ​train, ​plane, etc. that has been ​designed for someone to ​sit on: Chairs, ​sofas and ​benches are different ​types of seat. Please have/take a seat (= ​sit down). A ​car usually has a driver's seat, a front/​passenger seat and back/​rear seats. My ​ticket says 22D but there's already someone in (= ​sitting on) that seat. Is this seat free/taken (= is anyone using it)? Would you keep (= ​stop anyone ​else from ​sitting in) my seat (for me) while I go get some ​food?formal Please stay in/​keepyour seats (= ​staysitting down) until ​asked to ​leave. Could I book/​reserve two seats (= ​arrange for them to be ​officiallykept for me) for ​tomorrow evening's ​performance?
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seat noun (BOTTOM PART)

[C usually singular] the ​part of a ​piece of ​furniture or ​clothing on which a ​personsits: I've ​spilled some ​coffee on the seat of the ​armchair. The seat of those ​trouserslooks a little ​tight. Do you ​want to ​try a ​largersize?

seat noun (POSITION)

C2 [C] an ​officialposition as a ​politician or ​member of a ​group of ​people who ​control something: She has a seat on the ​board of ​directors. He is ​expected to lose his seat on the ​citycouncil in next month's ​elections. She won her seat in Parliament in 2004. He has a very safe seat (= a ​position that is very ​unlikely to be ​lost in an ​election). [C] Indian English the ​place in an ​office where a ​particularpersonsits: I'm ​sorry - he's not in his seat ​right now. [C] Indian English a ​place on a ​course to ​study something: On ​receipt of the ​tuitionfees, the ​college will ​issue a ​letterconfirmingyour seat on the ​course.

seat noun (BASE)

[C] a ​place that ​acts as a ​base or ​centre for an ​importantactivity: The seat of ​government in the US is in Washington, DC. St Petersburg was the seat of the ​Russian Revolution.
seat-of-the-pants
adjective [before noun] uk   us   /ˌsiːt.əv.ðəˈpænts/
She has a seat-of-the-pants ​ability to ​find the ​best way out of a ​crisis.

seatverb

uk   us   /siːt/
[T + adv/prep] to ​arrange for someone to have a ​particular seat: The ​waitergreeted me with a ​bigsmile and seated us by the ​window.seat yourself [usually + adv/prep] to ​sitsomewhere: "I'm so ​glad to ​see you!" she said, seating herself between Eleanor and Marianne.C2 [T not continuous] (of a ​building, ​room, ​table, or ​vehicle) to have enough seats for the ​statednumber of ​people: The new ​concerthall seats 1,500 ​people.

-seatsuffix

uk   us   /-siːt/
with enough ​seats for the ​particularnumber of ​people: a 2,000-seat ​theatre
(Definition of seat from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"seat" in American English

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seatnoun [C]

 us   /sit/

seat noun [C] (PLACE TO SIT)

a ​piece of ​furniture or other ​place for someone to ​sit: She ​left her ​jacket on the back of her seat. I got a seat on the ​flight to New York. Please take a seat (= ​sit down). A seat is a ​part of something on which a ​personsits: a ​bicycle seat There’s a ​piece of ​gumstuck under the seat of the ​chair. He ​stood up and ​brushed the ​sand off the seat of his ​pants.

seat noun [C] (OFFICIAL POSITION)

an ​officialposition as a ​member of a ​legislature or ​group of ​people who ​control an ​organization: She ​decided to ​run for a seat on the ​schoolboard.

seat noun [C] (PLACE)

a ​place that is a ​center for an ​importantactivity, esp. ​government: Pittsburgh is the ​county seat of Alleghany County.

seatverb [T]

 us   /sit/

seat verb [T] (HAVE PLACE TO SIT)

to have or be given a ​place to ​sit: I was seated between Jasmine and Emily. The ​concerthall seats 350. Our ​group is still ​waiting to be seated for ​dinner. Please be seated (= ​sit down).
(Definition of seat from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"seat" in Business English

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seatnoun [C]

uk   us   /siːt/
POLITICS an ​officialposition as a politician: a seat in sth a seat in Parliament/the ​House of Representatives She is expected to lose her seat at the next ​election.
WORKPLACE, MANAGEMENT an ​officialposition as a ​member of a ​group of ​people who ​control a ​company or ​organization: a seat on sth The ​investorsdemanded several seats on the ​board.
STOCK MARKET, FINANCE a ​position as a ​member of a particular stockexchange, commoditiesexchange, etc. who has the ​right to ​trade there: a seat on sth A seat on the New York Exchange ​confersmembership in the ​exchange.
COMMERCE, TRANSPORT one of the ​places on a ​plane, etc. or in a theatre, etc. where the ​passengers or ​audience sit: We ​managed to ​find a seat on a later ​flight. The best seats at the concert had been ​reserved for ​corporatesponsors.
(Definition of seat from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“seat” in Business English

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