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Meaning of “section” in the English Dictionary

"section" in British English

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sectionnoun

uk   /ˈsek.ʃən/  us   /ˈsek.ʃən/
  • section noun (PART)

B1 [C] one of the ​parts that something is ​divided into: the ​sports section of the ​newspaper the ​tail section of an ​aircraft Does the ​restaurant have a ​non-smoking section? The ​poorest sections of the ​community have much ​worsehealth. He was ​charged under section 17 of the Firearms Act (= ​according to that ​part of the ​law).

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  • section noun (CUT)

[C or U] specialized medical a ​cut made in ​part of the ​body in an ​operation
[C] specialized medical an ​operation in which a woman's uterus is ​cutopen to ​allow a ​baby to be ​born
Synonym
[C] specialized biology a very ​thinslice of a ​part of an ​animal, ​plant, or other ​object made in ​order to ​seeitsstructure: Each section is ​mounted on a ​slide and ​examined under the ​microscope.
[C] specialized architecture, geology, engineering a ​drawing or ​model that ​shows the ​structure of something by ​cuttingpart of it away: This vertical section of the ​soilshows four ​basicsoillayers.
[C] the ​shape of a ​flatsurface that is ​produced when an ​object is ​cut into ​separatepieces
in section
showing what something would ​look like if the ​surface was ​cut away and you could ​see inside: The first ​diagram is a ​view of the ​building from the ​street, and the second ​shows it in section.

sectionverb [T]

uk   /ˈsek.ʃən/  us   /ˈsek.ʃən/ UK
to ​officiallyforce someone who has ​mentalhealthproblems to ​stay in a ​hospital and ​receivetreatment because they might ​harm themselves or other ​people: He was sectioned under section 4 of the Mental Health Act.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of section from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"section" in American English

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sectionnoun [C]

 us   /ˈsek·ʃən/
a ​part of something: Dad always ​reads the ​sports section of the ​newspaper. He ​lived in a ​poor section of ​town. You’ll ​findicecream in the ​frozenfood section of the ​supermarket.

sectionverb [T]

 /ˈsek·ʃən/
to ​divide something into ​parts: If the ​tooth is sectioned lenghtwise, ​ridges of ​alternatingdark and ​lightrings can be ​seen.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of section from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"section" in Business English

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sectionnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈsekʃən/
COMMUNICATIONS one of the ​parts of a ​book, ​newspaper, ​website, etc. that ​deals with a particular ​subject: The ​article appeared in the ​business section of the Sunday Times.a section on sth The ​website has a useful section on ​businesslaw.
LAW one of the ​parts that a ​document or ​law is ​divided into, each of which has its own ​number: under section 2/20, etc. of sth The ​purchaser could have ​brought an ​action against the ​vendor under section 12 of the Sale of Goods ​Act.
MANAGEMENT, WORKPLACE one of the ​parts of an ​organization: His section was ​due to be ​audited. the Accounting and Finance Section
(Definition of section from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“section” in British English

“section” in American English

“section” in Business English

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