see Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “see” in the English Dictionary

"see" in British English

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seeverb

uk   us   /siː/ (present participle seeing, past tense saw, past participle seen)

see verb (USE EYES)

A1 [I or T] to be ​conscious of what is around you by using ​youreyes: Turn the ​light on so I can see. I can see you! [+ (that)] The ​teacher could see (that) the ​children had been ​fighting. [+ infinitive without to] Jacqui saw the ​cardrive up ​outside the ​policestation. [+ -ing verb] From the ​window we could see the ​childrenplaying in the ​yard. [+ past participle] His ​parents saw him ​awarded the winner's ​medal. See (= ​look at) p. 23 for ​prices and ​flightdetails.UK See over (= ​look at the next ​page) for ​furtherinformation.A2 [T] to ​watch a ​film, ​televisionprogramme, etc.: Did you see that ​documentary on Channel 4 last ​night?C1 [T often passive] to be the ​time or ​place when something ​happens: This ​summer has seen the end of ​waterrestrictions in the ​areathanks to a new ​reservoir.you ain't seen nothing yet humorous said to ​mean that more ​surprising or ​exciting things are ​likely to ​happen
More examples
  • I saw him this ​morning.
  • Have you seen Angela?
  • If you see Nicky say ​hello from me.
  • I've seen a few ​houses but none that I've really ​liked.
  • I haven't seen any ​shoes that I've ​wanted to ​buy.

see verb (UNDERSTAND)

B1 [T] to ​understand, ​know, or ​realize: [+ (that)] I see (that) the ​club is ​organizing a ​theatretrip next ​month. [+ question word] He can't see what ​difference it makes to come (= he doesn't ​think it is ​important if he comes) on ​Thursdayinstead of ​Friday. They didn't see the need/any need (= ​understand that it was ​important) to ​notifytheirmembers of the ​changes in writing. They ​refused to ​help because they're too ​busy, but he ​seems to see more in it than that. "I'm ​tired." "So I see - you've been ​yawning all ​afternoon." I was ​surprised that they couldn't see my ​point of ​view. The ​government didn't ​want to be seen to be making ​concessions to ​terrorists. After she ​read his ​book she ​started to see the ​issue in another/a different/a new ​light (= ​differently).
More examples
  • I see he's ​left that ​report on my ​desk.
  • I see Bill's on another of his ​trips.
  • I don't see why she's more ​important than anyone ​else.
  • Why can't you see things from my ​point of ​view?
  • I see what you're saying.

see verb (MEET)

A1 [I or T] to ​meet or ​visit someone, or to ​visit a ​place: We're seeing ​friends this ​weekend. I haven't seen Jerry around (= in the ​places I usually ​meet him) in the last few ​weeks. No one has seen much of Daryl since he got ​married. They see a lot of each other (= are often together). My ​mother is seeing the ​doctor again next ​week. The ​childrenwanted to see the ​circus. The ​agent said they could see the ​house (UK also see round the ​house) at 3 p.m. [T] to have a ​romanticrelationship with someone: How ​long has she been seeing him?
More examples
  • I'm seeing Peter ​tonight.
  • I saw her last ​week - we went out for ​dinner together.
  • I've ​arranged to see John at the ​weekend.
  • He's been seeing a woman that I ​work with.
  • She told me her ​husband had been seeing someone.

see verb (CONSIDER)

B2 [T] to ​consider or ​think about, ​especially to ​think about someone or something in a ​particular way, or to ​imagine someone doing a ​particularactivity: She didn't see herself asbrave. It was ​easy to see the ​gift as a ​kind of ​bribe. [+ obj + -ing verb ] I can't see her ​accepting (= I don't ​think she will ​accept) the ​job in the ​presentcircumstances. As I see it/things/the ​situation, we'll have to get ​extrahelp. Try and see it my way - I'll be ​left without any ​help if you go.
More examples

see verb (GO WITH)

[T usually + adv/prep] to take someone ​somewhere by going there with them: He saw his ​visitors to the ​door. Her ​friends saw her home. The ​securityguard saw the ​protesters off the ​premises.

see verb (TRY TO DISCOVER)

B2 [I + question word] to ​try to ​discover: Will you see if you can get anyone to ​help? I'll see what I can do.

see verb (MAKE CERTAIN)

C2 [+ (that)] to make ​certain that something ​happens: The ​receptionist said he'd see (that) she got the ​message.UK See (that) you're ​ready by five, or there'll be ​trouble.
Grammar

seenoun

(also See) /siː/ specialized
[C] a ​place where there is a ​cathedral and where a bishop or archbishop has ​authority: the See of York/Exeter/Lincoln bishops and ​their sees
(Definition of see from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"see" in American English

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seeverb

 us   /si/ (past tense saw  // , past participle seen  /sin/ )

see verb (USE EYES)

[I/T] to be ​aware of what is around you by using ​youreyes; ​look at something: [T] From the ​kitchenwindow, I can see the ​kidsplaying in the ​backyard. [+ question word] Can you see what is ​happening? [T] The ​agent said they could see the ​house at 3 p.m. [T] Did you see that ​documentary about ​homelessness on TV last ​night?

see verb (UNDERSTAND)

[I/T] to ​understand, ​know, or be ​aware: [I] "It’s ​easier if you ​hold it this way." "Oh, I see." [T] I can’t see any ​reason why they would ​object. [+ question word] I can see why you didn’t ​want to go out with him.

see verb (CONSIDER)

[I/T] to ​consider someone or something in a ​particular way, or to ​imagine someone doing a ​particularactivity: [T] Under the ​circumstances, I can’t see her ​accepting the ​job (= I do not ​think she will ​accept it). [T] I can’t see my ​brother as a ​businessman. [T] As I see it/the ​situation, we’ll have to get ​extrahelp. [I] "Do you ​think there’ll be ​time to ​stop for ​lunch?" "We’ll see (= I will ​consider it)." [+ question word] I’ll see how I ​feeltomorrow.

see verb (MEET)

[T] to ​meet, ​visit, or ​spendtime with someone: I saw Darlene last ​week. Mom is seeing the ​doctortomorrow. They see each other on ​weekends (= they are often together then). How ​long have they been seeing each other (= having a ​romanticrelationship)?

see verb (TRY TO DISCOVER)

[+ question word] to ​try to ​discover: Will you see who is at the ​door?

see verb (MAKE CERTAIN)

[+ that clause] to make ​certain (that something ​happens): She said she’d see that her ​boss gets the ​message.

see verb (EXPERIENCE)

[T] to ​experience something: This ​coat has seen a lot of ​wear. She’s seen a lot of ​changes in this ​office over the ​years. [T] If a ​time or ​place has seen something, it ​happened or ​existed there or then: This ​summer has seen ​unusually high ​temperatures.
(Definition of see from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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