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Meaning of “send” in the English Dictionary

"send" in British English

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sendverb [T]

uk   us   /send/ (sent, sent)
  • send verb [T] (POST/EMAIL)

A1 to ​cause something to go from one ​place to another, ​especially by ​post or ​email: [+ two objects] I'll send her a ​letter/​email/​parcel/​postcard next ​week. We'll send it by ​post/​airmail/​sea. Could you send a ​reply to them as ​quickly as ​possible? The ​newsreport was sent by ​satellite. She sent a ​message with John to say that she couldn't come. They sent her ​flowers for her ​birthday. Maggie sends her ​love and ​hopes you'll ​feelbettersoon.

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  • send verb [T] (CAUSE TO GO)

B2 to ​cause or ​order someone to go and do something: [+ to infinitive] We're sending the ​kids tostay with my ​parents for a ​couple of ​weeks. The ​commander has ​asked us to send reinforcements. They've sent ​theirson (away) to ​boardingschool. He was ​trying to ​explain but she ​becameimpatient and sent him away (= told him to ​leave).

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  • send verb [T] (CAUSE TO HAPPEN)

C2 to ​cause someone or something to do a ​particular thing, or to ​cause something to ​happen: The ​explosion sent the ​crowd into a ​panic. Watching ​television always sends me to ​sleep. [+ adj] UK His ​untidiness sends her ​crazy/​mad/​wild. [+ -ing verb] The ​announcement of the ​fall in ​profits sent the company's ​sharepriceplummeting (= ​caused it to go down a lot). The ​draught from the ​fan sent ​papersflying all over the ​room.

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(Definition of send from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"send" in American English

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sendverb [T]

 us   /send/ (past tense and past participle sent  /sent/ )
  • send verb [T] (HAVE DELIVERED)

to ​cause something to go or be taken ​somewhere without going yourself: Send a ​letter to my ​office. I like to send ​e-mail to my ​friends.
  • send verb [T] (MAKE SOMEONE GO)

to ​cause or ​arrange for someone to ​leave or go: The UN sent ​reliefworkers to the ​region. My ​parentswant to send me back to Argentina when I ​finish my ​studies. Who can ​afford to send ​theirkids to ​college these ​days?
  • send verb [T] (MAKE SOMETHING MOVE)

to make something move ​quickly by ​force: Wind sent ​clouds skittering ​across the ​sky. The ​researcher sent the ​particlesflyingapart.
  • send verb [T] (CAUSE TO HAPPEN)

to ​cause someone to ​feel or ​behave in a ​particular way, or to ​cause something to ​happen: Final ​exams always send me into a ​panic.
(Definition of send from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"send" in Business English

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sendverb [T]

uk   us   /send/ (sent, sent)
COMMUNICATIONS to cause something to go from one ​place to another, especially by ​mail, ​email, etc.: send a ​letter/​fax/​email send a ​reply/​response/​querysend sth to sth The schools ​collect used ​cellphones and send them to the ​phonerecyclingcompany.send sb sth Could you send them a ​reply as quickly as possible?
to cause or ​order someone to go and do something: send sb to sth They were sent to India for ​work.send sb to do sth She's been sent from Head ​Office to ​sort out this mess. send sb on a ​course/errand/​placement
to cause someone or something to do a particular thing, or to cause something to ​happen: send sth higher/up/through the roof Eventually ​demandoutstripssupply, sending ​prices through the roof. send sth ​plummeting/​plunging/​tumbling send sth ​soaring/​skyrocketing
(Definition of send from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“send” in Business English

Just who is driving this thing?
Just who is driving this thing?
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by Colin McIntosh Do you remember Herbie the Love Bug? Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle car in a string of Walt Disney movies. In typical Disney anthropomorphic style, Herbie goes his own way, falls in love, cries, plays jokes, and generally has a mind of his own. While the new driverless cars, like those being

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