separate Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “separate” in the English Dictionary

"separate" in British English

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separateadjective

uk   /ˈsep.ər.ət/  us   /-ɚ-/
B1 existing or ​happeningindependently or in a different ​physicalspace: The ​artdepartment and the ​musicdepartment are in two separate ​buildings. I ​try to keepmeat separate from other ​food in the ​fridge. I have my ​publiclife and my ​privatelife, and as ​far as ​possible I ​try to keep them separate. Three ​youths have been ​shot and ​killed in separate ​incidents this ​month.

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separateverb

uk   /ˈsep.ər.eɪt/  us   /-ə.reɪt/
  • separate verb (DIVIDE)

B2 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​divide into ​parts: The ​north and ​south of the ​country are separated by a ​mountainrange. You can get a ​specialdevice for separating ​eggwhites fromyolks. The ​top and ​bottomsections are ​quitedifficult to separate.

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  • separate verb (MOVE APART)

B2 [I or T] to make ​peoplemoveapart or into different ​places, or to ​moveapart: At ​school they always ​tried to separate Jane and me because we were ​troublemakers. Somehow, in the ​rush to get out of the ​building, I got separated from my ​mother. Perhaps we should separate now and ​meet up ​later.
  • separate verb (RELATIONSHIP)

B2 [I] to ​start to ​live in a different ​place from ​yourhusband or ​wife because the ​relationship has ​ended: My ​parents separated when I was six and ​divorced a ​couple of ​yearslater.
(Definition of separate from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"separate" in American English

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separateadjective

 us   /ˈsep·ər·ət/
existing or ​happeningindependently or in a different ​physicalspace: The ​middleschool and the high ​school are in two separate ​buildings. I have my ​publiclife and my ​privatelife, and as ​far as ​possible I ​try to ​keep them separate.
separately
adverb  us   /ˈsep·ər·ət·li/
You have to ​washdarkclothes and ​whitestuff separately.

separateverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈsep·əˌreɪt/
to ​cause two or more ​people or things to ​stop being with or near each other, or to be positioned between two or more things: [T] A six-foot-high ​wall separates ​ticketholders from those hoping to get ​tickets. [T] Fighting ​broke out between two ​hockeyplayers, and it took ​nearly five ​minutes to separate them. If two ​marriedpeople separate, they ​stopliving together as ​husband and ​wife, often as a ​part of a ​legalarrangement.
(Definition of separate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"separate" in Business English

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separateadjective

uk   us   /ˈsepərət/
not together, ​joined, or ​connected: We ​realised that the best way to ​progress the ​project would be to set up a separate ​company. We have separate ​bankaccounts.separate from sth The ​assets of the ​fund will be ring-fenced, which ​means they will be ​kept separate from the rest of the ​fund.

separateverb

uk   us   /ˈsepəreɪt/
[I or T] to ​divide into ​parts, or cause something to ​divide into ​parts: separate (sth) from sth They ​oppose the ​idea of Scotland separating from Britain.separate sth into sth We separated the workspace into ​cubicles using ​screens. separate a ​company/​business
[T] to consider two ​people or things as different or not ​connected: separate sth from sth These ​economic decisions cannot be separated from ​politics.separate sth and sth I ​find it difficult to separate ​home and ​business.
(Definition of separate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“separate” in American English

“separate” in Business English

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