Meaning of “separate” in the English Dictionary

"separate" in British English

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separateadjective

uk /ˈsep.ər.ət/ us /ˈsep.ɚ.ət/

B1 existing or happening independently or in a different physical space:

The art department and the music department are in two separate buildings.
I try to keep meat separate from other food in the fridge.
I have my public life and my private life, and as far as possible I try to keep them separate.
Three youths have been shot and killed in separate incidents this month.

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separateverb

uk /ˈsep.ər.eɪt/ us /ˈsep.ə.reɪt/

separate verb (DIVIDE)

B2 [ I or T ] to (cause to) divide into parts:

The north and south of the country are separated by a mountain range.
You can get a special device for separating egg whites from yolks.
The top and bottom sections are quite difficult to separate.

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separate verb (MOVE APART)

B2 [ I or T ] to make people move apart or into different places, or to move apart:

At school they always tried to separate Jane and me because we were troublemakers.
Somehow, in the rush to get out of the building, I got separated from my mother.
Perhaps we should separate now and meet up later.

separate verb (RELATIONSHIP)

B2 [ I ] to start to live in a different place from your husband or wife because the relationship has ended:

My parents separated when I was six and divorced a couple of years later.

(Definition of “separate” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"separate" in American English

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separateadjective

us /ˈsep·ər·ət/

existing or happening independently or in a different physical space:

The middle school and the high school are in two separate buildings.
I have my public life and my private life, and as far as possible I try to keep them separate.
separately
adverb us /ˈsep·ər·ət·li/

You have to wash dark clothes and white stuff separately.

separateverb [ I/T ]

us /ˈsep·əˌreɪt/

to cause two or more people or things to stop being with or near each other, or to be positioned between two or more things:

[ T ] A six-foot-high wall separates ticket holders from those hoping to get tickets.
[ T ] Fighting broke out between two hockey players, and it took nearly five minutes to separate them.

If two married people separate, they stop living together as husband and wife, often as a part of a legal arrangement.

(Definition of “separate” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"separate" in Business English

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separateadjective

uk /ˈsepərət/ us

not together, joined, or connected:

We realised that the best way to progress the project would be to set up a separate company.
We have separate bank accounts.
separate from sth The assets of the fund will be ring-fenced, which means they will be kept separate from the rest of the fund.

separateverb

uk /ˈsepəreɪt/ us

[ I or T ] to divide into parts, or cause something to divide into parts:

separate (sth) from sth They oppose the idea of Scotland separating from Britain.
separate sth into sth We separated the workspace into cubicles using screens.
separate a company/business

[ T ] to consider two people or things as different or not connected:

separate sth from sth These economic decisions cannot be separated from politics.
separate sth and sth I find it difficult to separate home and business.

(Definition of “separate” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)