serious Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “serious” in the English Dictionary

"serious" in British English

See all translations

seriousadjective

uk   /ˈsɪə.ri.əs/  us   /ˈsɪr.i-/
  • serious adjective (BAD)

B1 severe in ​effect; ​bad: a serious ​illness There were no ​reports of serious ​injuries. The new ​taxregulations have ​landed some of the ​smallercompanies in serious ​trouble. Drugs have ​become a serious ​problem in a lot of ​schools. This is a very serious ​offence. He's been taken to ​hospital where his ​condition is ​described as serious but ​stable. [after noun] mainly Indian English very ​ill

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • serious adjective (NOT JOKING)

B1 not ​joking or ​intended to be ​funny: Please don't ​laugh - I'm being serious. He was ​wearing a very serious ​expression and I ​knew something was ​wrong. On the ​surface it's a very ​funnynovel but it does have a more serious ​underlyingtheme.B1 A serious ​person is ​quiet, ​thinkscarefully about things, and does not ​laugh a lot: I ​remember her as a very serious ​child.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • serious adjective (DETERMINED)

[after verb] determined to ​follow a ​particularplan of ​action: Is she serious about going to ​liveabroad? [after verb] If two ​people who have a ​lovingrelationship are serious about each other, they ​intend to ​stay with each other for a ​longtime and ​possiblymarry: She's had a lot of ​boyfriends but Simon's the only one she's been serious about.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • serious adjective (NEEDING ATTENTION)

B2 [before noun] needing or ​deservingyourcompleteattention: That's an ​interestingjoboffer - I'd give it some serious ​consideration if I were you. We've got some serious ​talking to do, you and me.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • serious adjective (EXTREME)

informal extreme in ​degree or ​amount: We did some ​fairly serious ​walking over the ​weekend. I ​mean we're ​talking serious (= a ​largeamount of)money, ​right? informal very good of ​itstype: This is a serious ​wine, Belle, you have to ​try some.
(Definition of serious from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"serious" in American English

See all translations

seriousadjective

 us   /ˈsɪr·i·əs/
  • serious adjective (NOT JOKING)

not ​joking; not ​intended to ​amuse: You can never ​tell when he’s serious.
  • serious adjective (NEEDING ATTENTION)

needingcompleteattention: That’s an ​interestingjoboffer – I’d give it serious ​consideration if I were you.
  • serious adjective (BAD)

severe in ​effect; ​bad: Fortunately, there were no serious ​injuries.
  • serious adjective (DETERMINED)

determined to ​follow a ​particularplan of ​action: Is she serious about ​moving to Nevada? You have to ​start getting serious about ​yourstudies. If two ​people who have a ​romanticrelationship are serious about each other, they ​intend to ​continue the ​relationship and ​possiblymarry.
(Definition of serious from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of serious?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

costume

the set of clothes typical of a particular country or period of history, or suitable for a particular activity

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More