settle Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “settle” in the English Dictionary

"settle" in British English

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settleverb

uk   /ˈset.l̩/  us   /ˈset̬-/
  • settle verb (AGREE)

B2 [T] to ​reach a ​decision or an ​agreement about something, or to end a ​disagreement: Good, that's all settled - you ​send out the ​invitations for the ​party, and I'll ​organize the ​food. [+ question word] They haven't ​yet settled when the ​wedding is going to be. "The ​tickets are €40 each." "Well, that settles that - I can't ​afford that much." I'd like to get this ​matter settled once and for all (= ​reach a ​finaldecision on it).B2 [I or T] to ​arrange something: The ​details of the ​contract have not ​yet been settled. Our ​lawyeradvised us that it would be ​better to settle out of ​court (= ​reach an ​agreement in a ​legalcase without it being ​decided in a ​court of ​law). It took ​months to settle (= ​bring to an end) the ​dispute/​strike. My ​father and I have ​agreedfinally to settle ​our differences (= ​stoparguing).

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  • settle verb (MAKE COMFORTABLE)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​relax into a ​comfortableposition: After ​dinner we settled in ​front of the ​television for the ​evening. The ​dentist told her ​patient to settle back in the ​chair. He settled himself down with a ​newspaper, and ​waited for the ​flight to ​arrive.

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  • settle verb (LIVE)

B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to go and ​livesomewhere, ​especiallypermanently: After they got ​married, they settled in Brooklyn. [I or T, often passive] to ​arrive, ​especially from another ​country, in a new ​place and ​start to ​live there and use the ​land: America was first settled by ​people who came ​across from ​Asia over 25,000 ​years ago.

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  • settle verb (MOVE LOWER)

C1 [I] to ​move to a ​lowerlevel and ​stay there; to ​drop: The ​house had been ​empty for ​years, and ​dust had settled on all the ​surfaces. Do you ​think the ​snow will settle (= ​remain on the ​ground and other ​surfaces without ​melting)? The ​contents of this ​package may settle (= ​fall towards the ​bottom of the ​container and so ​seem to be less).

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  • settle verb (QUIET)

[I or T] to ​becomequiet and ​calm, or to make something or someone do this: The ​weather is ​expected to settle towards the end of the ​week. I'll ​call you back as ​soon as I've settled the ​kids for the ​night. Before a ​performance, she ​takes three ​deep breaths to settle her nerves. We're very ​busy this ​week, but things should settle (down) a ​bit after the ​weekend.UK Joe's ​parents are very ​worried about him because he doesn't ​seem to be ​able to settle to (= to give his ​wholeattention to) anything.
(Definition of settle from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"settle" in American English

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settleverb

 us   /ˈset̬·əl/
  • settle verb (MAKE COMFORTABLE)

[always + adv/prep] to get or to ​becomecomfortable: [T] Campbell settled herself in ​front of a ​blazingfire. [I] He settled back in his ​chair and took out a ​book.
  • settle verb (AGREE)

[I/T] to ​reach a ​decision or an ​agreement about something, or to end a ​disagreement: [T] Rogers ​paid $2 million to settle the ​lawsuit. [T] Americansturn to a ​dictionary to settle ​questions of ​language. [I] Negotiators are ​hopeful the two ​sides will settle.settle out of court If you settle out of ​court, you ​reach an ​agreement in a ​legalcase without ​holding a ​trial in ​court: The ​defendantagreed to settle out of ​court.
  • settle verb (PAY)

[T] to ​paymoneyowed: He ​sold his ​photographs to settle some ​olddebts.
  • settle verb (LIVE)

[I/T] to ​live in a ​place or to go ​somewhere to ​live, esp. ​permanently: [I] After they got ​married, they settled in Virginia. [T] Immigrants settled this ​island two hundred ​years ago. [I] fig. An early-evening ​glow settles on the ​city (= the ​city has ​begun to ​glow).
  • settle verb (MOVE LOWER)

[I] to move to a ​lowerlevel and ​stay there; ​drop: Dust can settle into the ​wetpaint and ​spoil the ​finish. Unused ​farmmachinery settled in high ​weeds behind the ​house.
(Definition of settle from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"settle" in Business English

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settleverb

uk   us   /ˈsetl/
[T] to ​paymoney that you ​owe: settle a ​bill/​debt Only half of their ​clients settled theiraccounts on ​time.
[I or T] to end an argument by ​reaching an ​agreement to do something: settle a ​dispute/argument/​lawsuit The ​companypaid $5 million to ​formeremployees to settle ​claims of ​unfairdismissal. Union and ​management were urged to settle their differences. The ​company decided it was ​cheaper to settle rather than fight the ​case in ​court.
to make a ​final decision about something: We need a ​finalmeeting to settle the matter once and for all. OK, so that's settled then.
[I] FINANCE if ​prices, ​values, etc. settle, they ​stopmoving up or down: They expect ​housepriceinflation to settle around 10%.settle at sth After a rocky ​ride, ​shares in the ​entertainmentcompany settled at $13.
settle out of court LAW to end an argument without having to go to a ​court of ​law, usually by ​agreeing to the ​payment of a particular ​amount of ​money: In view of the ​legalcosts, they decided to settle out of ​court.
(Definition of settle from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“settle” in Business English

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