shade Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “shade” in the English Dictionary

"shade" in British English

See all translations

shadenoun

uk   us   /ʃeɪd/
  • shade noun (SLIGHT DARKNESS)

B1 [U] slightdarknesscaused by something ​blocking the ​directlight from the ​sun: The ​sun was ​hot, and there were no ​trees to ​offer us shade. The ​childrenplayed in/under the shade of a ​largebeachumbrella.
See also
C2 [C] a ​covering that is put over an ​electriclight in ​order to make it less ​bright: The ​lamps all had ​matchingpurple shades. [U] specialized (also shading) art the ​parts of a ​picture or ​painting that the ​artist has made ​slightlydarker than the other ​parts: A good ​artist can ​produce a very ​realisticeffect using only light and shade.shades [plural] informal →  sunglasses : She was ​wearing a ​blackleatherjacket and shades. [C] US (UK blind) a ​piece of ​materialfixed onto a ​wooden or ​metalroller that can be ​pulled down to ​cover a ​window

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • shade noun (DEGREE)

B2 [C] a ​type or ​degree of a ​colour: Their ​kitchen is ​painted an ​unusual shade ofyellow/an ​unusualyellow shade. This ​haircolouring comes in several shades. The ​room has been ​decorated in pastel shades (= ​soft and ​lightcolours)throughout. [C] something that is ​slightly different from other, ​similar things: They are ​hoping to ​satisfy all shades ofpublic opinion. There are several shades of ​meaning in that ​sentence.a shade C1 slightly: Don't you ​think those ​trousers are a shade too ​tight? The ​journey took us a shade over/under three ​hours. Our new ​carcost us a shade more/less than we were ​expecting it to.shades of sth/sb informal said to ​mean that something or someone makes you ​remember something or someone ​similar: In his ​speech he said - shades of Martin Luther King Jr. - that he had a ​dream.

shadeverb

uk   us   /ʃeɪd/
  • shade verb (STOP LIGHT)

[T] to ​preventdirectlight from ​shining on something: I shaded my eyes from the ​glare of the ​sun. The ​broadavenues are shaded by ​splendidtrees.
shaded
adjective uk   us   /ˈʃeɪ.dɪd/
Nothing will ​grow in the shaded ​part of the ​garden. The shaded ​areas of the ​plans show where the ​houses will be ​built.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of shade from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"shade" in American English

See all translations

shadenoun

 us   /ʃeɪd/
  • shade noun (DARKNESS)

[C/U] darkness and ​coolertemperatures caused by something ​blocking the ​directlight from the ​sun: [U] The ​truck was ​parked in the shade. [C/U] A shade is a ​covering that is put over a ​light to make it less ​bright: [C] The ​lamps had ​matching shades. [C/U] A shade is also a ​cover, usually ​attached at the ​top of a ​window, that can be ​pulled over a ​window to ​block the ​light or to ​keeppeople from ​looking in.
  • shade noun (DEGREE)

art [C] a ​degree of ​darkness of a ​color: He painted the ​room a ​beautiful shade of ​red. [C] A shade can also ​mean one ​type among several: Simple yes-or-no ​questions can’t ​reveal all shades of ​opinion.
Idioms

shadeverb

 us   /ʃeɪd/
  • shade verb (DARKEN)

[T] to make ​part of something ​slightlydarker: Students shade the ovals on ​multiple-choicetests.
  • shade verb (CHANGE BY DEGREES)

[I/T] to ​graduallychange something, or to ​graduallychange from one thing to another: [I] The ​sky shaded from ​pink into ​red.
  • shade verb (BLOCK LIGHT)

[T] to ​preventdirectlight from ​shining on something: She shaded her ​eyes with her ​hand. The ​backyard is shaded by ​talloaks.
(Definition of shade from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of shade?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

carnival

(a special occasion or period of) public enjoyment and entertainment involving wearing unusual clothes, dancing, and eating and drinking, usually held in the streets of a city

Word of the Day

Chest pains and palpitations: talking about illness (2)
Chest pains and palpitations: talking about illness (2)
by Liz Walter,
February 03, 2016
My previous post (My leg hurts: Talking about illness (1)) presented some general vocabulary to use at the doctor’s. This one looks at some more specific areas of illness and explains some useful words and phrases that you may need to use or understand on a visit to the doctor’s. There are several

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More