shallow Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “shallow” in the English Dictionary

"shallow" in British English

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uk   /ˈʃæl.əʊ/  us   /-oʊ/

shallow adjective (NOT DEEP)

B2 having only a ​shortdistance from the ​top to the ​bottom: The ​stream was ​fairly shallow so we were ​able to ​walkacross it. She told her ​children to ​stay in the shallow end (of the ​swimmingpool). Fry the ​onions in a shallow ​pan. These ​beechtrees have shallow ​roots (= ​roots which do not go very ​deep into the ​ground).shallow breathing breathing in which you only take a ​smallamount of ​air into ​yourlungs with each ​breath
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shallow adjective (NOT SERIOUS)

C2 disapproving not ​showingserious or ​carefulthought: I ​thought the ​film was ​pretty shallow. He's ​physicallyattractive, but shallow.
adverb uk   /-li/  us   /-oʊ-/
noun [U] uk   us   /-nəs/
Because of the shallowness of the ​water, we could ​see the ​fish in it very ​clearly. The ​fineperformances of the ​actorshide the shallowness of the play's ​script.


uk   /ˈʃæl.əʊ/  us   /-oʊ/
the shallows [plural] the shallow ​part of an ​area of ​water: Alligators ​live in the shallows.
(Definition of shallow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"shallow" in American English

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shallowadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /ˈʃæl·oʊ/

shallow adjective [-er/-est only] (NOT DEEP)

having only a ​shortdistance from the ​top to the ​bottom: shallow ​water Transfer the ​tofu and ​broccoli to a shallow ​bowl.

shallow adjective [-er/-est only] (NOT SERIOUS)

not ​showingserious or ​carefulthought or ​realunderstanding: Reviewers called the ​booklightweight, shallow, and ​simplistic.
(Definition of shallow from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“shallow” in American English

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