shed Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “shed” in the English Dictionary

"shed" in British English

See all translations

shednoun [C]

uk   /ʃed/  us   /ʃed/
B2 a ​smallbuilding, usually made of ​wood, used for ​storing things: a ​tool/​storage shedUK a ​garden/​bicycle shed
a ​large, ​simplebuilding used for a ​particularpurpose: the ​lambing shed a ​cow shed

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

shedverb

uk   /ʃed/  us   /ʃed/ (present participle shedding, past tense and past participle shed)
  • shed verb (GET RID OF)

[T] (often used in ​newspapers) to get ​rid of something you do not need or ​want: 900 ​jobs will be shed over the next few ​months. Psychotherapy ​helped him to shed some of his ​insecurity/​inhibitions. I'm going on a ​diet to ​see if I can shed (= ​becomethinner by ​losing) a few ​pounds.
[T] to ​lose a ​covering, such as ​leaves, ​hair, or ​skin, because it ​falls off ​naturally, or to ​drop something in a ​natural way or by ​accident: The ​trees shed ​their leaves in ​autumn. They ​ran down to the ​water, shedding ​clothes as they went.UK A ​lorry had shed a ​load of ​gravelacross the ​road.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • shed verb (PRODUCE)

shed tears, blood, light, etc.
C1 to ​producetears, ​light, ​blood, etc.: She shed a few ​tears at her daughter's ​wedding. So much ​blood has been shed (= so many ​people have been ​badlyhurt or ​killed) in this ​war.

she'd

uk   /ʃid/ /ʃiːd/  us   /ʃid/  /ʃiːd/
short form of she had: She'd ​found the ​answer, at last.
short form of she would: She'd be a ​greatmanagingdirector, don't you ​think?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • She'd already ​left.
  • She'd ​eaten all of it.
  • She'd already told me.
  • She'd ​love to ​see you.
  • She'd come if you ​asked her.
(Definition of shed from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"shed" in American English

See all translations

shednoun [C]

 us   /ʃed/
  • shed noun [C] (BUILDING)

a ​smallbuilding usually used for ​storage or ​shelter: The ​lawnmower is ​kept in the shed.

shedverb

 us   /ʃed/
  • shed verb (GET RID OF)

[T] (present participle shedding, past tense and past participle shed) to get ​rid of something: As the ​daywarmed up, she shed her ​sweater.
  • shed verb (FALL OFF)

[I/T] to ​losehair, ​leaves, or ​skin, or to ​causehair, ​skin, or ​leaves to ​drop: [I] My ​cat shed all over the ​couch. [T] By ​November, the ​trees had shed ​theirleaves.
  • shed verb (FLOW)

[T] to make ​blood or ​tearsflow: He didn’t shed one ​tear when his ​oldcar was ​stolen.
  • shed verb (SPREAD)

[T] (present participle shedding, past tense and past participle shed) to ​spreadlight: A ​singlebulb shed a ​harshlight on the ​table.

she’d

 us   /ʃid/
contraction of she had or she would: She’d (= She had) already ​left. I ​think she’d (= she would) like to go to the ​dance with you.
(Definition of shed from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"shed" in Business English

See all translations

shedverb [T]

uk   us   /ʃed/ (shedding, shed, shed)
to get rid of something you do not need or want, especially ​jobs or ​employees: There are ​rumors that the ​retailer will shed more than 400 jobs over the next ​year. shed ​workers/​employees/​staff
STOCK MARKET to ​losevalue in the ​stockmarket or other ​financialmarkets: The ​stock shed another 16% of its ​value yesterday, ​closing at $15.25. The Dow Jones ​industrialaverage shed 242.66 ​points, or 1.97%, to ​close at 12,075.96.

shednoun [C]

uk   us   /ʃed/
a large simple ​building, usually used for ​storingequipment: The ​structure is used as a ​truckstorage shed.
(Definition of shed from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of shed?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“shed” in British English

“shed” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

star

a very large ball of burning gas in space that is usually seen from the earth as a point of light in the sky at night

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More