Meaning of “shield” in the English Dictionary

"shield" in British English

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shieldnoun [ C ]

uk /ʃiːld/ us /ʃiːld/

C2 in the past, a large, flat object made of metal or leather that soldiers held in front of their bodies to protect themselves

a large, flat object made of strong plastic that police officers hold in front of their bodies to protect themselves:

The police held up their riot shields against the flying rocks and bricks.

something or someone used as protection or providing protection:

The anti-personnel mines were laid as a protective shield around the town.
Anger can function as a shield against (= a way of avoiding) even more painful emotions of loss and hurt.

a flat object with two straight sides, a rounded or pointed lower edge, and usually a straight top edge, on which there is a coat of arms

an object shaped like a shield that is used as a symbol or badge:

The blazer has a shield sewn on the pocket.
US When he retired from the police, he had to turn in his shield.

UK an object shaped like a shield that is given as a prize:

Our school won the county basketball shield this year.

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shieldverb [ T ]

uk /ʃiːld/ us /ʃiːld/

(Definition of “shield” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"shield" in American English

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shieldnoun [ C ]

us /ʃild/

a piece of metal or other material, carried to protect the front of the body when being attacked, or a person or thing that provides protection:

The police held up their riot shields.
The ozone layer is the earth’s shield against radiation from the sun.

to protect someone or something:

When the lights came on, I shielded my eyes with my hands,
Mom tried to shield us from the bad news.

(Definition of “shield” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)