short Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “short” in the English Dictionary

"short" in British English

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shortadjective

uk   /ʃɔːt/  us   /ʃɔːrt/

short adjective (DISTANCE)

A1 small in ​length, ​distance, or ​height: a short ​skirt Her ​hair is much shorter than it used to be. It's only a short ​walk to the ​station. I'm ​fairly short but my brother's very ​tall.B2 used to say that a ​name is used as a shorter ​form of another ​name: Her name's Jo - it's short for Josephine. Her name's Josephine, or Jo for short.
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short adjective (TIME)

A1 being an ​amount of ​time that is less than ​average or ​usual: a short ​film/​visit He's ​grown so much in such a short ​time. I ​work much ​better if I take a short ​break every ​hour or so.A2 Short ​books, ​letters, and other ​examples of writing do not ​contain many words and do not take much ​time to ​read: It's a very short ​book - you'll ​read it in an ​hour.
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short adjective (LACKING)

be short (of/on sth)
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B1 to not have enough of something: to be short ofspace/​time We're short oncoffee - I'd ​better get some more. The ​bill comes to £85, but we're £15 short. I'm a little short (= I do not have much ​money) this ​week - could you ​lend me ten ​dollars?
short of breath unable to ​breathe very well, for ​example because you have been ​running or doing some ​type of ​energeticexercise: She's always short of ​breath when she ​climbs the ​stairs.be in short supply to be few or not enough in ​number: Free ​desks are in short ​supply in this ​office.go short mainly UK to not have something, ​especially when it is something you need in ​order to ​live: My ​parents didn't have much ​money, but they made ​sure we didn't go short (of anything).

short adjective (NOT PATIENT)

[after verb] saying little but ​showingslight impatience or ​anger in the few words that you say: I'm ​sorry if I was a ​bit short with you on the ​phone this ​morning.
shortness
noun [U] uk   /ˈʃɔːt.nəs/  us   /ˈʃɔːrt-/
shortness of ​time The ​disease may ​causesweating, ​nausea, ​vomiting, and shortness of ​breath (= difficulties in ​breathing).

shortnoun [C]

uk   /ʃɔːt/  us   /ʃɔːrt/

short noun [C] (DRINK)

UK informal (US shot) a ​drink of spirits (= ​type of ​strongalcohol) without ​water or any other ​liquidadded: She only ​drinks shorts, never ​wine or ​beer.

short noun [C] (FILM)

a short ​film, ​especially one made for ​showing before the ​mainfilm at a ​cinema

short noun [C] (ELECTRICITY)

informal for short circuit

shortverb [I or T]

uk   /ʃɔːt/  us   /ʃɔːrt/
informal for short-circuit (short circuit) : The ​plumber shorted the ​washingmachine.

shortadverb

uk   /ʃɔːt/  us   /ʃɔːrt/
before the ​arranged or ​expectedtime or ​place: We ​wanted to ​explain the ​plansfully, but the ​chairman stopped us short, as there were other ​importantmatters to ​discuss.

short-prefix

uk   /ʃɔːt-/  us   /ʃɔːrt-/
used with ​adjectivesending in -ed ​formed from ​nouns to ​describe something with a ​shortpart: a short-haired ​dog (= a ​dog with ​shorthair) a short-sleeved ​shirt (= a ​shirt with ​shortsleeves)
(Definition of short from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"short" in American English

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shortadjective

 us   /ʃɔrt/

short adjective (LENGTH)

[-er/-est only] having little ​length, ​distance, or ​height: Short ​hair is back in ​style. It’s only a short ​walk to the ​store.

short adjective (TIME)

[-er/-est only] of a ​smallamount of ​time, or less than the ​average or ​usualamount of ​time: Mary Lou was here a short while ago. There will be a short ​delay in the ​flight while we ​load a few more ​bags.

short adjective (LACKING)

[not gradable] not ​reaching a ​desiredamount or ​level; ​lacking: The ​bill comes to $85, but we’re $15 short.

shortadverb

 us   /ʃɔrt/

short adverb (LENGTH)

[-er/-est only] in a way that makes something short in ​length, ​distance, or ​height: She ​decided to ​cut her ​hair short.

short adverb (TIME)

[not gradable] before the ​arranged or ​expectedtime or ​place: I ​started to say something, but he ​cut me short (= ​stopped me from ​continuing).
(Definition of short from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"short" in Business English

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shortadjective

uk   us   /ʃɔːt/
[not before a noun] not having enough of something that you need: be short of sth We are very short of ​staff and if we face a ​major incident we'll be ​stretched.be short on sth The ​Budget was short on announcements about ​personaltaxes.leave sth short of sth The rocky ​economy has ​left the ​state so short of ​money that it must ​cutspending.
[not before a noun] not ​available or not large enough in ​number or ​amount: The most common ways of ​ending an ​interview are saying that time is short. Those from ​well-off homes tend to be ​spendthrifteven when money is short.
less than a particular ​amount: short of sth The ​charityraised just short of €7m last ​year.
STOCK MARKET used to describe the ​selling of ​shares that you have ​borrowed, hoping that their ​price will ​fall before you ​buy them back and ​return them to their ​owner, making a ​profit: In a short ​sale, an ​investor can ​sellstock he doesn't own, hoping to ​buy the ​shares at a ​cheaperprice later on.
used to describe a shorter ​form of a ​name or word: short for sth Ami is short for artificial ​machineintelligence.for short Keep an ​eye on Canada's Northern Telecom, Nortel for short.
at short notice (US also on short notice) with little ​warning: Many ​start-upcompanies need the freedom to ​hire and ​firestaff at short ​notice.
in short supply not ​available in large ​amounts or ​numbers: Temporary ​workers are in short ​supply. If you can ​offertalents that are in short ​supply, you are in a ​strongposition.

shortadverb

uk   us   /ʃɔːt/
STOCK MARKET if you ​sellshares short, you ​sellshares that you have ​borrowed, hoping that their ​price will ​fall before you ​buy them back and ​return them to their ​owner, making a ​profit: The group's ​conservativegrowthportfolio isn't ​allowed to sellstocks short. A popular ​hedgefundmove is to go short.go short on sth Speculators are going short on the Hong Kong ​dollar.
run short if you ​run short of something, you have too little of it ​left: The ​bank has been plagued for months by ​speculation that it is ​running short ofcapital. if something ​runs short, there is little of it ​left: Time is for a ​deal to get done. In two months ​food will ​run short.

shortverb [T]

uk   us   /ʃɔːt/
STOCK MARKET to ​sellshares that you have ​borrowed, hoping that their ​price will ​fall before you ​buy them back and ​return them to their ​owner, so that you make a ​profit: As many as 27% of the company's ​shares have been shorted.
(Definition of short from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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