showcase Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “showcase” in the English Dictionary

"showcase" in British English

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showcasenoun [C]

uk   /ˈʃəʊ.keɪs/  us   /ˈʃoʊ-/

showcase noun [C] (CONTAINER)

a ​container with ​glasssides in which ​valuable or ​importantobjects are ​kept so that they can be ​looked at without being ​touched, ​damaged, or ​stolen

showcase noun [C] (OPPORTUNITY)

a ​situation or ​event that makes it ​possible for the ​bestfeatures of something to be ​seen: The Venice Film Festival has always been the showcase ofItaliancinema. The ​exhibition is an ​annual showcase for British ​design and ​innovation.

showcaseverb [T]

uk   /ˈʃəʊ.keɪs/  us   /ˈʃoʊ-/
to show the ​bestqualities or ​parts of something: The ​mainaim of the ​exhibition is to showcase British ​design.
(Definition of showcase from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"showcase" in American English

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showcasenoun [C]

 us   /ˈʃoʊˌkeɪs/

showcase noun [C] (CABINET)

a ​cabinet, usually of ​glass, in which ​objects are ​kept that are ​valuable or ​easilybroken: a jeweler’s showcase

showcase noun [C] (OPPORTUNITY)

a ​place or ​event where something, esp. something new, can be ​shown or ​performed: The Sundance Film Festival is an ​especiallysympathetic showcase for ​unusualfilms.

showcaseverb [T]

 us   /ˈʃoʊˌkeɪs/

showcase verb [T] (SHOW BEST PARTS)

to show the ​bestqualities or ​parts of something: In the ​opening set, he showcased his own ​songs.
(Definition of showcase from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"showcase" in Business English

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showcasenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈʃəʊkeɪs/
MARKETING a ​situation or an ​event that makes it possible for the best ​features of something to be seen: a showcase for sth The North American International Auto Show is a showcase for new ​technologiesrelated to ​driving.a showcase of sth The ​expo will be the largest showcase of ​greenbuildingproducts ever ​held. The ​forumincluded a ​technology showcase, during which ​participants were ​provided with ​hands-ondemonstrations. 530 ​acres of ​land will be ​transformed into a showcase city.
COMMERCE in a ​store, museum, etc., a glass ​box in which ​products or ​objects can be ​displayed: They smashed a glass showcase, took 12 ​pieces of ​jewellery and fled.

showcaseverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈʃəʊkeɪs/
MARKETING to show what someone or something is like, especially their best ​qualities or ​features: We wanted a ​season that would showcase all the different kinds of things we do. The 10 finalists are ​asked a ​question before ​judges decide who best showcased her ​personality and ​capabilities.
(Definition of showcase from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “showcase”
in Chinese (Simplified) 容器, (玻璃)陈列柜,展示橱…
in Turkish vitrin, sergi vitrini, sergileme…
in Russian показ лучшего…
in Chinese (Traditional) 容器, (玻璃)陳列櫃,展示櫥…
in Polish wizytówka…
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