shunt Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “shunt” in the English Dictionary

"shunt" in British English

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shuntverb

uk   us   /ʃʌnt/
  • shunt verb (TRAINS)

[T] to ​move a ​train or carriage onto a different ​track in or near a ​station using a ​specialrailwayenginedesigned for this ​purpose
  • shunt verb (MOVE)

[T usually + adv/prep] to ​move someone or something from one ​place to another, usually because that ​person or thing is not ​wanted, and without ​considering any ​unpleasanteffects: I ​spent most of my ​childhood being shunted (about) between my ​parents who had ​divorced when I was five. He shunts his ​kids off to a ​camp every ​summer. Viewers are ​sick of ​theirfavouritesitcoms being shunted tolatertimes to make way for ​livesportscoverage.
shunt
noun [C usually singular] uk   us  

shuntnoun [C]

uk   us   /ʃʌnt/ specialized
  • shunt noun [C] (PASSAGE)

a ​hole or ​passage that ​allowsliquid to ​move from one ​part of the ​body to another, either ​foundnaturally in the ​body or put into the ​body in an ​operation
(Definition of shunt from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"shunt" in American English

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shuntverb [T always + adv/prep]

 us   /ʃʌnt/
to move someone or something to the ​side or away: Seals can shunt ​blood away from ​theirskin to ​maintainbodytemperature. You can’t just shunt ​yourproblemsaside.
(Definition of shunt from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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