sight Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “sight” in the English Dictionary

"sight" in British English

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sightnoun

uk   us   /saɪt/
  • sight noun (ABILITY TO SEE)

B1 [U] the ​ability to ​see: If ​your sight is ​poor, you should not ​drive a ​car. The ​old woman has lost her sight (= has ​becomeblind).
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  • sight noun (VIEW)

B2 [C or S or U] something that is in someone's ​view: The ​flowers at the ​annualflower show were a ​beautiful sight. You should always keep sight ofyourbags (= have them where you can ​see them) while you're at the ​airport.informal He was a ​real sight in his ​oldclothes (= he ​lookedmessy or ​silly). The ​childlaughed at the sight of (= when she ​saw) the new ​toy.formal The ​lawyerrequested sight of (= to ​see) the ​papers. I don't ​darelet the ​children out of my sight (= go where I cannot ​see them) at the ​park. The ​policeofficer was ​hidden out of sight (= where he could not be ​seen) behind a ​tree. The ​castle came into sight (= ​started to be ​able to be ​seen) as we went round a ​bend in the ​road. We're ​looking for a ​house which is within sight of (= from which it is ​possible to ​see) the ​mountains.figurative After three ​years of ​campaigning, the end is ​finally in sight (= will ​happensoon) for Jon. I caught sight of (= ​saw for a ​moment) my ​formerteacher while I was out ​shopping today, but she ​turned a ​corner and I lost sight of (= could no ​longersee) her. "Do you ​know David Wilson?" "I haven't ​met him, but I ​know him by sight (= I ​recognize him, but do not ​know him)."informal She ​hated/​loathed the sight of (= ​hated) her ​formerhusband.informal They used to be very good ​friends, but now they can't ​bear/​stand the sight of (= ​hate) each other. The ​questionseemedeasy at first sight (= when they first ​saw it), but when the ​studentstried to ​answer it, they ​discovered how ​difficult it was.the sights B1 places of ​interest, ​especially to ​visitors: We ​spent a ​week in Rome ​looking at all the sights.sight unseen without ​seeing something first: I never ​buy anything sight ​unseen.

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  • sight noun (GUN PART)

[C usually plural] a ​part of a ​gun or other ​device through which you ​look to ​help you ​aim at something: Make ​sure you ​line up the sights before you ​fire the ​gun.

sightverb [T]

uk   us   /saɪt/
(Definition of sight from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"sight" in American English

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sightnoun

 us   /sɑɪt/
  • sight noun (SEEING)

[U] the ​ability to ​see, or the ​act of ​seeing something: Machines don’t have a ​sense of sight. The sight of ​sickchildrendisturbs her. I ​knowDavid by sight (= I ​know what he ​looks like). Officers ​arrested the looters on sight (= as ​soon as they ​saw them).
  • sight noun (VIEW)

[C/U] something that is in someone’s ​view, or the ​view someone has: [C] The ​finishline was a ​welcome sight for the ​runners. [C] Don’t ​let the ​children out of ​your sight. [U] Keep ​yourbags in sight. [C/U] A sight is also an ​interestingplace: [C] No sights in Moscow are more ​historic than the ​Kremlin.
  • sight noun (GUN PART)

[C] a ​device, esp. on a ​gun or ​telescope (= ​device for ​looking at ​objects that are ​far away), through which you ​look to ​help you ​aim at something: Locate the ​target in ​your sight.

sightverb [T]

 us   /sɑɪt̬/
  • sight verb [T] (SEE)

to ​suddenlysee something or someone: After several ​days at ​sea, the ​sailorsfinally sighted ​land.
(Definition of sight from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"sight" in Business English

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sightnoun [U]

uk   us   /saɪt/ BANKING, FINANCE
after sight used to say that an ​amount of ​money must be ​paid within a particular ​number of days, months, etc. after the ​document showing the ​amountowed is received by the ​personpaying: The ​bill read "30 days after sight." a ​draftpayable at two months after sight
at sight used to say that an ​amount of ​money must be ​paid as soon as the ​document showing the ​amountowed is received by the ​personpaying: The ​bankdraft was ​marked "at sight". a ​bill that is payable at sight
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(Definition of sight from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“sight” in Business English

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