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Meaning of “sit” in the English Dictionary

"sit" in British English

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sitverb

uk   /sɪt/ us   /sɪt/ present participle sitting, past tense and past participle sat
  • sit verb (BE SEATED)

A1 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to (cause someone to) be in a position in which the lower part of the body is resting on a seat or other type of support, with the upper part of the body vertical: to sit at a table/desk to sit in an armchair to sit on a chair/a horse/the ground He came and sat (down) next to me.informal Sit yourself down and have a nice cool drink. The child's father sat her (down) on a chair.
[I usually + adv/prep] to be a model for a painter, photographer, etc.: Monet's wife sat for him many times.
[I] (of an animal such as a dog) to move into a position with its back legs bent and its tail end on the ground: We're trying to train our dog to sit.
[I usually + adv/prep] If a bird sits on its eggs, it covers them with its body to keep them warm before they hatch.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • sit verb (BE A MEMBER)

[I] to be a member of an official group: I'm going to be sitting on the committee for one more year.US All of the federal judges currently sitting (= in office) in Maryland hail from Baltimore.
  • sit verb (EXAM)

B2 [T] UK to take an exam: After I've sat my exams, I'm going on holiday.Australian English I sat for my exams today.
  • sit verb (TAKE CARE OF)

[I usually + adv/prep] to babysit: I'm sitting my sister's kids this Saturday.
(Definition of sit from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"sit" in American English

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sitverb

us   /sɪt/
  • sit verb (REST)

[I/T] present participle sitting, past tense and past participle sat /sæt/ to be in a position with your buttocks on a surface that supports your body, or to cause someone to be in this position: [I] Andrea was sitting on the couch, watching TV. [T] Dad sat her on a chair and told her not to move. Sit still (= sit without moving) while I comb your hair!
  • sit verb (BE IN A POSITION)

[I] present participle sitting, past tense and past participle sat /sæt/ to be or stay in a position or place: That book is still sitting on my shelf unread. The college sits on top of a hill.
  • sit verb (MEET)

[I] present participle sitting, past tense and past participle sat /sæt/ (of a legislature or court) to have an official meeting or series of meetings: The Supreme Court sits from October to June.
  • sit verb (TAKE CARE)

[I/T] short form ofbaby-sit
(Definition of sit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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