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Meaning of “situation” in the English Dictionary

"situation" in British English

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situationnoun [C]

uk   /ˌsɪtʃ.uˈeɪ.ʃən/ us   /ˌsɪtʃ.uˈeɪ.ʃən/
B1 the set of things that are happening and the conditions that exist at a particular time and place: the economic/political situation Her news put me in a difficult situation. "Would you get involved in a fight?" "It would depend on the situation." I'll worry about it if/when/as the situation arises (= if/when/as it happens).
old use a job: My sister has a good situation as a teacher in the local school.
formal the position of something, especially a town, building, etc.: The house's situation in the river valley is perfect.

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(Definition of situation from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"situation" in American English

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situationnoun [C]

us   /ˌsɪtʃ·uˈeɪ·ʃən/
a condition or combination of conditions that exist at a particular time: I was in a situation where I didn’t have cash handy.
(Definition of situation from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"situation" in Business English

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situationnoun [C]

uk   /ˌsɪtjuˈeɪʃən/ us  
the conditions that exist at a particular time and place: Some dealers have taken advantage of the situation by adding £1,000 or more to the suggested retail price. The airline did a good job of dealing with a very difficult situation. economic/financial/political situation
the particular position of a building, business, city, etc.: Florida's situation is ideal for making use of major sources of ocean power.
old-fashioned a job
(Definition of situation from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“situation” in Business English

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Luckily, no one was hurt. (Adverbs for starting sentences)
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