smack Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “smack” in the English Dictionary

"smack" in British English

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smackverb

uk   us   /smæk/
[T] to ​hit someone or something ​forcefully with the ​flat inside ​part of ​yourhand, ​producing a ​short, ​loudnoise, ​especially as a way of ​punishing a ​child: I never smack my ​children. I'll smack ​your bottom if you don't ​behave yourself. [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​hit something hard against something ​else: I smacked my ​head on the ​corner of the ​shelf. She smacked her ​books down on the ​table and ​stormed out of the ​room.
Phrasal verbs

smacknoun

uk   us   /smæk/

smack noun (HIT FORCEFULLY)

[C] a ​hit from someone's ​flathand as a ​punishment: You're going to get a smack on the ​bottom if you don't ​stopthrowingyourtoys. [C] informal a ​hit given with the fist (= ​closedhand): I gave him a smack on the ​jaw. [C] a ​short, ​loudnoise: She ​slammed her ​briefcase down on the ​desk with a smack. [C] informal a ​loudkiss: a ​big smack on the ​lips

smack noun (DRUG)

[U] slang heroin (= a ​strongillegaldrug): How ​long has she been on smack?

smackadverb

uk   us   /smæk/ (UK also smack bang, US also smack dab)

smack adverb (EXACTLY)

exactly in a ​place or a ​situation: She ​lives smack in the ​middle of Shanghai.US The ​kids are smack ​dab in the ​middle of the ​fight between ​theirparents.

smack adverb (DIRECTLY)

directly and ​forcefully, ​producing a ​short, ​loudnoise: I wasn't ​looking where I was going and ​walked smack into a ​lamppost.
(Definition of smack from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"smack" in American English

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smackverb [I/T]

 us   /smæk/

smack verb [I/T] (HIT FORCEFULLY)

to ​hit someone or something ​forcefully, usually making a ​loudnoise: [T] I was ​afraid she was going to smack me. [I] The ​carspun around and smacked into a ​tree. [T] She smacked the ​ball over the ​fence. [M] He smacked his ​hand down on the ​table to get ​ourattention.
Phrasal verbs

smackadverb [not gradable]

 us   /smæk/

smack adverb [not gradable] (DIRECTLY)

directly and with ​force: He ​stopped the ​car so ​suddenly, the ​car behind ​ran smack into him.

smacknoun [C]

 us   /smæk/
a ​forcefulhit, usually making a ​loudnoise: The men were ​keeping the ​volleyball in the ​air with sure-handed smacks.
(Definition of smack from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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