Meaning of “smack” in the English Dictionary

"smack" in British English

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smackverb

uk /smæk/ us /smæk/

[ T ] to hit someone or something forcefully with the flat inside part of your hand, producing a short, loud noise, especially as a way of punishing a child:

I never smack my children.
I'll smack your bottom if you don't behave yourself.

[ I or T, usually + adv/prep ] to hit something hard against something else:

I smacked my head on the corner of the shelf.
She smacked her books down on the table and stormed out of the room.

Idiom(s)

Phrasal verb(s)

smacknoun

uk /smæk/ us /smæk/

smackadverb

uk /smæk/ us /smæk/ UK also smack bang, US also smack dab

(Definition of “smack” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"smack" in American English

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smackverb [ I/T ]

us /smæk/

smack verb [ I/T ] (HIT FORCEFULLY)

to hit someone or something forcefully, usually making a loud noise:

[ T ] I was afraid she was going to smack me.
[ I ] The car spun around and smacked into a tree.
[ T ] She smacked the ball over the fence.
[ M ] He smacked his hand down on the table to get our attention.

Idiom(s)

Phrasal verb(s)

smackadverb [ not gradable ]

us /smæk/

smack adverb [ not gradable ] (DIRECTLY)

directly and with force:

He stopped the car so suddenly, the car behind ran smack into him.

smacknoun [ C ]

us /smæk/

a forceful hit, usually making a loud noise:

The men were keeping the volleyball in the air with sure-handed smacks.

(Definition of “smack” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)