smooth Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “smooth” in the English Dictionary

"smooth" in British English

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uk   us   /smuːð/

smooth adjective (REGULAR)

B1 having a ​surface or consisting of a ​substance that is ​perfectlyregular and has no ​holes, lumps, or ​areas that ​rise or ​fallsuddenly: a smooth ​surface/​texture/​consistency This ​custard is ​deliciously smooth and ​creamy. Mix together the ​butter and ​sugar until smooth. The ​roadahead was ​flat and smooth. This ​moisturizer will ​help to ​keepyour skin smooth.
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smooth adjective (NOT INTERRUPTED)

C2 happening without any ​suddenchanges, ​interruption, or ​difficulty: We had a very smooth flight with no ​turbulence at all. The car's ​improvedsuspension gives a much smoother ride than ​earliermodels. An ​efficienttransportsystem is ​vital to the smooth running of a country's ​economy.

smooth adjective (TASTING PLEASANT)

having a ​pleasantflavour that is not ​sour or ​bitter: This ​coffee is ​incredibly smooth and ​rich.

smooth adjective (NOT SINCERE)

very ​polite, ​confident, and ​able to ​persuadepeople, but in a way that is not ​sincere: The ​deputydirector is so smooth that many of his ​colleaguesdistrust him. In ​jobinterviews, the ​successfulcandidatestend to be the smooth talkers who ​knowexactly how to make the ​rightimpression.
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈsmuːð.nəs/
The ​winepossesses a smoothness and ​balanceddepth that is ​rare. I just ​love the smoothness of ​silk.


uk   us   /smuːð/

smooth verb (MAKE FLAT)

[I or T] to ​moveyourhandsacross something in ​order to make it ​flat: He ​straightened his ​tienervously and smoothed (down) his ​hair.

smooth verb (REMOVE PROBLEMS)

[T] to ​remove difficulties and make something ​easier to do or ​achieve: We ​encourageparents to ​help smooth ​their children's way through ​school. We must do more to smooth the country's path to ​democraticreform.

smooth verb (RUB)

[T + adv/prep] to ​cover the ​surface of something with a ​liquid or ​softsubstance, using ​gentlerubbingmovements: Pour some ​oil into the ​palm of ​yourhand and then smooth it over ​yourarms and ​neck.
(Definition of smooth from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"smooth" in American English

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smoothadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /smuð/

smooth adjective [-er/-est only] (REGULAR)

having a ​surface or ​substance that is ​perfectlyregular and has no ​holes or ​lumps or ​areas that ​rise or ​fallsuddenly: a smooth ​surface Mix together the ​butter and ​sugar until smooth. The baby’s ​skin is so smooth!

smooth adjective [-er/-est only] (NOT INTERRUPTED)

happening without any ​suddenchanges, ​interruption, ​inconvenience, or ​difficulty: a smooth ​ride/​flight The ​bill had a smooth ​passage through both ​houses of ​Congress.

smooth adjective [-er/-est only] (POLITE)

polite, confident, and ​persuasive, esp. in a way that ​lackssincerity: I ​trust an ​honestface more than a smooth ​talker.

smoothverb [T]

 us   /smuð/

smooth verb [T] (MAKE EASIER)

to ​removedifficulties and make something ​easier to do: We must do more to smooth the country’s ​path to ​democraticreform.

smooth verb [T] (MAKE REGULAR)

to make something ​perfectlyflat or ​regular: Use ​finesandpaper to smooth the ​surface before varnishing. She ​smoothed the ​wrinkles from her ​skirt.
(Definition of smooth from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"smooth" in Business English

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smoothverb [T]

uk   us   /smuːð/
in statistics, to ​change very high and very ​lownumbers in a ​series in ​order to show the ​main direction of the ​series more clearly: We've smoothed these ​figures so that you can see the ​overallpicture more easily.
(Definition of smooth from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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