smudge Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “smudge” in the English Dictionary

"smudge" in British English

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smudgenoun [C]

uk   us   /smʌdʒ/
a ​mark with no ​particularshape that is ​caused, usually by ​accident, by ​rubbing something such as ​ink or a ​dirtyfingeracross a ​surface: Her ​hands were ​covered in ​dust and she had a ​black smudge on her ​nose.figurative She said we were ​nearly there, but the ​island was still no more than a ​distant smudge on the ​horizon.
smudgy
adjective uk   us   /ˈsmʌdʒ.i/

smudgeverb [I or T]

uk   us   /smʌdʒ/
smudging
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈsmʌdʒ.ɪŋ/
(Definition of smudge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"smudge" in American English

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smudgenoun [C]

 us   /smʌdʒ/
a ​markleft on a ​surface, usually ​unintentionally, from having ​touched something ​wet or ​sticky: Trev ​wiped a smudge of ​chocolate from the ​side of his ​mouth.

smudgeverb [T]

 us   /smʌdʒ/
to make a ​dirty, ​wet, or ​stickymark on a ​surface: She was ​sweaty and her ​face was smudged with ​dirt. If you smudge something that is ​neat, you make it ​messy: She ​draws a ​line and then smudges it with her ​finger.
(Definition of smudge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “smudge”
in Korean 자국, 얼룩…
in Arabic لَطْخة, بُقْعة…
in Malaysian kesan kotor…
in French tache, traînée…
in Russian пятно, клякса…
in Chinese (Traditional) (擦拭後留下的)汙跡,污痕…
in Italian sbaffo, sbavatura…
in Turkish pis leke, sıvanmış leke…
in Polish maz, smuga…
in Spanish mancha, borrón…
in Vietnamese vết bẩn, vết ố…
in Portuguese borrão, mancha…
in Thai รอยเปื้อน…
in German der Klecks…
in Catalan esborrall, taca…
in Japanese しみ, 汚れ…
in Chinese (Simplified) (擦拭后留下的)污迹,污痕…
in Indonesian lumaran…
What is the pronunciation of smudge?
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“smudge” in British English

“smudge” in American English

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