spark Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “spark” in the English Dictionary

"spark" in British English

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sparknoun

uk   /spɑːk/  us   /spɑːrk/
  • spark noun (FIRE/ELECTRICITY)

C2 [C] a very small piece of fire that flies out from something that is burning, or one that is made by rubbing two hard things together, or a flash of light made by electricity: Sparks were flying out of the bonfire and blowing everywhere. You can start a fire by rubbing two dry pieces of wood together until you produce a spark.
spark of anger, inspiration, life, etc.
a very small amount of a particular emotion or quality in a person
Idioms

sparkverb [T]

uk   /spɑːk/  us   /spɑːrk/
(Definition of spark from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"spark" in American English

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sparknoun [C]

 us   /spɑrk/
a very small bit of something burning that flies out from a fire, or a flash of light seen when an electric current crosses an open space: Flame, smoke, and sparks climbed into the dark sky. Sparks from the old wiring started the fire. fig.No one can light the spark that will make you a writer (= the thing that causes you to write).
A spark of something is a small amount of it: When students show a spark of interest, I try to give them extra encouragement.
Idioms

sparkverb [T]

 us   /spɑrk/
to start a fire: Downed power lines sparked fires in several parts of town. fig.Parks’s actions in 1955 sparked the Civil Rights Movement. We try to find stories that will spark our students’ imaginations.
(Definition of spark from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“spark” in American English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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