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Meaning of “special” in the English Dictionary

"special" in British English

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specialadjective

uk   /ˈspeʃ.əl/  us   /ˈspeʃ.əl/
  • special adjective (NOT USUAL)

A2 not ​ordinary or ​usual: The ​car has a ​number of special ​safetyfeatures. Is there anything special that you'd like to do today? Passengers should ​tell the ​airline in ​advance if they have any special ​dietaryneeds. I don't ​expect special ​treatment - I just ​want to be ​treatedfairly. Full ​details of the ​electionresults will be ​published in a special ​edition of tomorrow's ​newspaper. I have a ​suit for special occasions. There's a special offer on ​peaches (UK also peaches are on specialoffer) (= they are being ​sold at a ​reducedprice) this ​week.
A2 especiallygreat or ​important, or having a ​quality that most ​similar things or ​people do not have: Could I ​ask you a special ​favour? I'm ​cooking something special for her ​birthday.

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  • special adjective (PARTICULAR)

B1 [before noun] having a ​particularpurpose: Firefighters use special ​breathingequipment in ​smokybuildings. Some of the ​children have special ​educationalneeds. You need special ​tyres on ​yourcar for ​snow. She ​works as a special ​adviser to the ​president.

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specialnoun [C]

uk   /ˈspeʃ.əl/  us   /ˈspeʃ.əl/
a ​televisionprogramme that is made for a ​particularreason or ​occasion and is not ​part of a ​series: a three-hour ​electionnight special
a ​dish that is ​available in a ​restaurant on a ​particularday that is not usually ​available: Today's specials are written on the ​board.
mainly US a ​product that is being ​sold at a ​reducedprice for a ​shortperiod: Today's specials ​include T-shirts for only $2.99.
(Definition of special from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"special" in American English

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specialadjective

 us   /ˈspeʃ·əl/
  • special adjective (NOT USUAL)

not ​ordinary or ​usual: a special ​occasion special ​attention/​treatment The ​car has a ​number of special ​safetyfeatures. Is there anything special you’d like to do today? The ​magazinepublished a special ​anniversaryissue.
Special can also ​meanunusuallygreat or ​important: You’re very special to me.
  • special adjective (PARTICULAR)

[not gradable] having a ​particularpurpose: Kevin goes to a special ​school for the ​blind. She’s a special ​correspondent for ​National Public Radio.

specialnoun [C]

 us   /ˈspeʃ·əl/
  • special noun [C] (THING NOT USUALLY AVAILABLE)

something that is not usually ​available: There’s a two-hour special (= a ​televisionprogram that is not ​regularlyshown) on the ​Olympicstonight. Our restaurant’s specials today are ​pasta primavera, ​bakedchicken with ​rice, and ​shrimp scampi (= these ​foods are not always ​sold).
A special is also the ​sale of ​goods at a ​reducedprice: The ​store had a special on ​lawnfurniture this ​week.
(Definition of special from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"special" in Business English

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specialadjective

uk   us   /ˈspeʃəl/
not ordinary or usual: Hongkong has a special ​relationship with the world's ​financialmarkets.
having a particular ​purpose: special ​representative/​adviser/​committee

specialnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈspeʃəl/
a ​product that is being ​sold at a ​reducedprice for a ​shortperiod: a special on sth This week we have a special on children's toys.
(Definition of special from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“special” in Business English

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