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Meaning of “spike” in the English Dictionary

"spike" in British English

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spikenoun [C]

uk   /spaɪk/  us   /spaɪk/
  • spike noun [C] (SHAPE)

a narrow, thin shape with a sharp point at one end, or something, especially a piece of metal, with this shape: There were large spikes on top of the railings to stop people climbing over them. Some types of dinosaur had sharp spikes on their tails.
spikes
a set of short, pointed pieces of metal or plastic, attached to the bottom of shoes worn for particular sports, that stop the person wearing the shoes from sliding on the ground, or shoes with these pointed pieces

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spikeverb [T]

uk   /spaɪk/  us   /spaɪk/
  • spike verb [T] (HIT)

in the sport of volleyball, to hit the ball so that it goes almost straight down on the other side of the net
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"spike" in American English

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spikenoun [C]

 us   /spɑɪk/
  • spike noun [C] (POINT)

a long metal nail used to hold something in place, or a shape that is long and narrow and comes to a point at one end: railroad spikes
Spikes are also pointed pieces of metal fixed on the bottom of special shoes, used in some sports to catch in the ground and prevent falling or sliding, or the shoes themselves.
A spike is also a sudden increase, often shown on a graph (= type of drawing) by a long, narrow shape that comes to a point at the top: The upward spike in prices was attributed to bad weather in farm areas.

spikeverb [T]

 us   /spɑɪk/
  • spike verb [T] (MAKE STRONGER)

to add a strong or dangerous substance, usually to a drink or to food: In Hungary you would find yourself eating a local dish of goulash copiously spiked with paprika.fig. Their writing is spiked with a dry, cutting wit.
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"spike" in Business English

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spikenoun [C]

uk   us   /spaɪk/
a higher price, amount, etc., usually before a fall: a spike in sth Local florists saw a spike in business for Mother's Day. If price spikes continue, people will not be able to afford the new houses they want.

spikeverb [I]

uk   us   /spaɪk/
to reach a higher price, amount, etc., usually before a fall: Cement prices are spiking.spike to sth The jobless rate in October spiked to a five-year high.
spiking
adjective
There are worries about the spiking interest rates.
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“spike” in American English

“spike” in Business English

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