spike Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “spike” in the English Dictionary

"spike" in British English

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spikenoun [C]

uk   us   /spaɪk/
  • spike noun [C] (SHAPE)

a ​narrow, ​thinshape with a ​sharppoint at one end, or something, ​especially a ​piece of ​metal, with this ​shape: There were ​large spikes on ​top of the ​railings to ​stoppeopleclimbing over them. Some ​types of ​dinosaur had ​sharp spikes on ​theirtails.spikes a set of ​short, ​pointedpieces of ​metal or ​plastic, ​attached to the ​bottom of ​shoesworn for ​particularsports, that ​stop the ​personwearing the ​shoes from ​sliding on the ​ground, or ​shoes with these ​pointedpieces

spikeverb [T]

uk   us   /spaɪk/
  • spike verb [T] (MAKE STRONGER)

to make a ​drinkstronger by ​addingalcohol, or to ​addflavour or ​interest to something: She ​claimed that someone had spiked her drink with ​whisky. The ​pasta was ​served in a ​creamsauce spiked withblackpepper. His writing is spiked withhumour.
  • spike verb [T] (HIT)

in the ​sport of ​volleyball, to ​hit the ​ball so that it goes ​almoststraight down on the other ​side of the ​net
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"spike" in American English

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spikenoun [C]

 us   /spɑɪk/
  • spike noun [C] (POINT)

a ​longmetalnail used to ​hold something in ​place, or a ​shape that is ​long and ​narrow and comes to a ​point at one end: railroad spikes Spikes are also ​pointedpieces of ​metalfixed on the ​bottom of ​specialshoes, used in some ​sports to ​catch in the ​ground and ​preventfalling or ​sliding, or the ​shoes themselves. A spike is also a ​suddenincrease, often ​shown on a ​graph (= ​type of ​drawing) by a ​long, ​narrowshape that comes to a ​point at the ​top: The ​upward spike in ​prices was attributed to ​badweather in ​farmareas.

spikeverb [T]

 us   /spɑɪk/
  • spike verb [T] (MAKE STRONGER)

to ​add a ​strong or ​dangeroussubstance, usually to a ​drink or to ​food: In Hungary you would ​find yourself ​eating a ​localdish of ​goulash copiously spiked with ​paprika.fig. Their writing is spiked with a ​dry, ​cuttingwit.
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"spike" in Business English

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spikenoun [C]

uk   us   /spaɪk/
a ​higherprice, ​amount, etc., usually before a ​fall: a spike in sth Local florists saw a spike in ​business for Mother's Day. If price spikes continue, ​people will not be able to ​afford the new ​houses they want.

spikeverb [I]

uk   us   /spaɪk/
to ​reach a ​higherprice, ​amount, etc., usually before a ​fall: Cement prices are spiking.spike to sth The ​joblessrate in October spiked to a five-year high.
spiking
adjective
There are worries about the spiking ​interestrates.
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“spike” in American English

“spike” in Business English

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