spot Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “spot” in the English Dictionary

"spot" in British English

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spotnoun [C]

uk   /spɒt/  us   /spɑːt/

spot noun [C] (CIRCLE)

B1 a ​small, usually round ​area of ​colour that is ​differentlycoloured or ​lighter or ​darker than the ​surface around it: He had a spot of ​grease on his ​tie.B1 one of many spots, that ​form a ​pattern: I ​wore that ​skirt with the ​green spots.B2 UK a ​raised, ​paleredcircle on the ​skin that is ​temporary: Teenagers often ​suffer a lot from spots. mainly UK a ​smallamount: I ​felt a few spots of ​rain. Let's ​stop for a spot of ​lunch. I'm having a spot of bother (= some ​trouble) with one of my back ​teeth.
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spot noun [C] (PLACE)

B2 a ​particularplace: This ​looks like a ​nice spot for a ​picnic.on the spot at the ​place where an ​event is ​happening or has ​recentlyhappened: The ​police were called and they were on the spot within three ​minutes. C2 immediately: You can be ​sacked on the spot for ​stealing.
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spot noun [C] (PART OF A SHOW)

a ​shortlength of ​time in a show that is given to a ​particularperformer: She's doing a ​regular five-minute spot on his show.

spotverb

uk   /spɒt/  us   /spɑːt/ (-tt-)

spot verb (SEE)

B2 [T] to ​see or ​notice someone or something, usually because you are ​looking hard: I've just spotted ​Mark - he's over there, near the ​entrance. If you spot any ​mistakes in the ​article just ​mark them with a ​pencil. [+ -ing verb] The ​police spotted him driving a ​stolencar. [+ question word] I ​soon spotted what was ​wrong with the ​printer. [+ that] The ​policewoman spotted that I hadn't got my ​seatbelt on and ​signalled me to ​stop.well spotted UK used to ​praise someone who has ​noticed something: "I've just ​seenyourglasses - they're under the ​table." "Ah, well spotted!"
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spot verb (RAIN)

[I] UK If you say it's spotting (with ​rain), you ​mean that a few ​drops of ​rain are ​falling.
(Definition of spot from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"spot" in American English

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spotnoun [C]

 us   /spɑt/

spot noun [C] (MARK)

a ​mark, usually round, that is different esp. in ​color from the ​area around it: You got a spot on ​your new ​blouse. esp. CdnBr A spot is a pimple .

spot noun [C] (PLACE)

a ​particularplace: a ​vacation spot Our ​cat has a ​favorite spot where he ​loves to ​sleep. A spot is also a ​job in a ​particularorganization or a ​position within a ​group, esp. in ​sports: When Sain was ​injured, they ​asked me to ​fill his spot.

spot noun [C] (BROADCAST)

a ​period of ​time during which a ​broadcasttakesplace: NBC put the show on in the 7 p.m. spot. A spot is also an ​advertisement: a 30-second spot

spotverb [T]

 us   /spɑt/ (-tt-)

spot verb [T] (SEE)

to ​see or ​notice someone or something: Darryl spotted a ​woodpecker high on the ​tree.
(Definition of spot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"spot" in Business English

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spotnoun [C]

uk   us   /spɒt/
MARKETING a ​television or radio ​advertisement: a radio/television spot We are ​planning a ​series of radio spots during the afternoon ​commute.
MARKETING a ​period of ​time during which a radio or ​televisionadvertisement is ​broadcast: The ​firmbought a 30-second spot during ​primetime every evening.

spotadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /spɒt/
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to be ​delivered immediately, rather than in the future: Spot ​trades are ​executed immediately at the ​prevailingexchangerate.
(Definition of spot from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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