Meaning of “spray” in the English Dictionary

"spray" in British English

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spraynoun

uk /spreɪ/ us /spreɪ/

spray noun (LIQUID)

[ U ] a mass of very small drops of liquid carried in the air:

Can you feel the spray from the sea/waterfall?

B2 [ C ] a liquid that is forced out of a special container under pressure so that it becomes a mass of small liquid drops like a cloud:

a quick spray of perfume/polish

B2 [ C ] a mass of small drops of liquid spread onto plants and crops, etc. from a special piece of equipment, or the piece of equipment itself:

Farmers use a lot of chemical sprays on crops.

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sprayverb [ I or T, usually + adv/prep ]

uk /spreɪ/ us /spreɪ/

B2 to spread liquid in small drops over an area:

She sprayed herself with perfume.
Vandals had sprayed graffiti on the wall.
The pipe burst and water was spraying everywhere.
figurative Rush hour commuters were sprayed with bullets by a gunman in a car.

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(Definition of “spray” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"spray" in American English

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spraynoun

us /spreɪ/

spray noun (LIQUID)

[ C/U ] a mass of very small drops of liquid forced through the air, or a container from which small drops of liquid are forced out:

[ U ] As the waves crashed over the rocks, some of the ocean spray reached them where they stood.
[ C ] When my nose is stuffy, I use a nasal spray.

spray noun (FLOWERS)

[ C ] a single, small branch or stem with leaves and flowers on it, or a small arrangement of cut flowers:

On the table was a spray of fresh flowers.

sprayverb [ I/T ]

us /spreɪ/

spray verb [ I/T ] (FORCE OUT LIQUID)

to put a mass of small drops of liquid on someone or something or into the air, or to flow out of a container in a mass of small drops:

[ T ] Store employees offer to spray you with perfume.
[ T ] fig. They were sprayed with flying glass from the shattered windows.

(Definition of “spray” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)