Meaning of “squeal” in the English Dictionary

"squeal" in British English

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squealverb [ I ]

uk /skwiːl/ us /skwiːl/

to make a long, very high sound or cry:

We could hear the piglets squealing as we entered the farmyard.
The brakes squealed as the van rounded the corner.
The two children squealed with joy.

informal to complain about something loudly:

The threat of further changes in the education system is making teachers squeal.

slang disapproving to give information to the police about people you know who have committed a crime:

When he finds out who squealed on him, he's going to make them very sorry.

squealnoun [ C ]

uk /skwiːl/ us /skwiːl/

(Definition of “squeal” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"squeal" in American English

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squealverb

us /skwil/

squeal verb (MAKE SOUND)

[ I/T ] to make a long, very high sound or cry:

[ I ] The tires squealed as I sped away.
[ T ] "This is awesome," Mary Lou squealed in her coach’s ear.

squeal verb (GIVE INFORMATION)

[ I ] slang to give the authorities information about people you know who have committed crimes or done something wrong:

He refused to squeal on his buddies.

squealnoun [ C ]

us /skwil/

a long, very high sound or cry:

She collapsed into giggles and squeals when her sister tickled her.

(Definition of “squeal” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)