squeeze Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “squeeze” in the English Dictionary

"squeeze" in British English

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squeezeverb

uk   us   /skwiːz/

squeeze verb (PRESS TOGETHER)

B2 [T] to ​press something ​firmly, ​especially from all ​sides in ​order to ​changeitsshape, ​reduceitssize, or ​removeliquid from it: Cut the ​lemon in ​half and squeeze the ​juice into the ​bowl. As she ​waited to go into the ​exam, he squeezed her ​hand (= ​pressed it ​affectionately with his ​hand) and ​wished her good ​luck. Once he had ​finishedcleaning the ​floor, he squeezed the ​cloth out. He ​reloaded the ​gun, took ​aim, and then squeezed (= ​pulled back) the trigger.figurative The ​studio is using all ​sorts of ​marketingtricks to squeeze as much ​profit from the ​movie as they can. [T] If you are squeezed by ​financialdemands, they ​cause you ​financialproblems: Small ​businesses are being squeezed by ​heavytaxation.
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squeeze verb (MOVE)

C1 [I + adv/prep] to get in, through, under, etc. with ​difficulty: She squeezed through the ​crowd and ​found a ​seat at the ​front. They ​managed to squeeze under the ​fence and get into the ​festival without ​paying.

squeezenoun

uk   us   /skwiːz/

squeeze noun (PRESS)

[C] the ​act of ​pressing something ​firmly: She gave the ​present a ​quick squeeze and ​tried to ​guess what was inside. Garnish the ​fish with some ​freshparsley and a squeeze of ​lemon.

squeeze noun (LIMIT)

[C usually singular] a ​reduction or ​limit: The squeeze onprofits in the ​oilindustry has ​led to thousands of ​redundancies. The squeeze onlocalspendingmeans that many ​services will have to be ​cut. [C usually singular] a ​period in which the ​supply of ​money is ​limited by the ​government because of ​economic difficulties: The ​government has ​imposed a ​sharp credit squeeze in an ​attempt to ​hold down ​inflation.

squeeze noun (SPACE)

[S] a ​situation in which ​people or things are ​pushed or ​forced into a ​smallspace: I can give you a ​lift, but it'll be a tight squeeze as I'm taking four other ​people as well.
(Definition of squeeze from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"squeeze" in American English

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squeezeverb

 us   /skwiz/

squeeze verb (PRESS TOGETHER)

[T] to ​press something ​firmly, or to ​force something out, esp. a ​liquid, by ​pressing: Bake for 15 ​minutes, then squeeze the ​cloves to get the ​softenedgarlic out. I squeezed her ​shoulder (= ​pressed it ​affectionately with a ​hand).

squeeze verb (FORCE INTO)

[always + adv/prep] to ​force someone or something into a ​smallspace or a ​shortperiod of ​time: [I] I’m just not ​able to squeeze into last year’s ​swimsuit. [T] She’s ​asking me to squeeze a ​shoppingtrip into my ​day off. [M] You can squeeze in six ​people at the ​table.

squeezenoun

 us   /skwiz/

squeeze noun (PRESSING TOGETHER)

[C] the ​act of ​pressing something ​firmly: I gave his ​shoulder a squeeze. fig.Stateparks will ​feel the squeeze from ​budgetcuts (= the ​cuts will have a limiting ​effect).

squeeze noun (FORCING INTO A SPACE)

[C usually sing] the ​act of ​forcing someone or something into a ​smallspace, often by ​pushing or ​pressing: It’ll be a ​tight squeeze with four other ​people in the ​car, but I’ll give you a ​lift.
(Definition of squeeze from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"squeeze" in Business English

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squeezeverb [T]

uk   us   /skwiːz/ FINANCE, ECONOMICS
to ​reduce the ​amount of ​money that a ​person, ​company, or ​government can ​spend or ​earn: Higher ​energy and ​utilitybills are squeezing ​disposableincomes. squeeze ​profits/​budgets/​marginssqueeze taxpayers/consumers/borrowers Rising ​foodprices continue to squeeze ​consumers ever ​harder.
to ​reduce the ​number of things that are ​produced or ​sold: squeeze supplies/exports Europeanexports have been squeezed by the ​cheapdollar and equally ​cheap Chinese ​yuan.

squeezenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /skwiːz/ FINANCE, ECONOMICS
a large ​reduction in the ​amount of ​money that a ​person, ​company, or ​government can ​spend or ​earn: a budget/spending/cash squeeze Hard choices have to be made during a ​budget squeeze. an economic/​financial/​monetary squeezea squeeze on sth A squeeze on ​earnings is expected to be ​highlighted in ​officiallabourmarketfigures this week.put a/the squeeze on sb/sth Competition from ​discountoperations is putting the squeeze on mid-market ​chains.a squeeze in margins/markets/profits A squeeze in the ​globalcreditmarket has ​forced the ​company to ​scrapplans to ​sell its US drinks ​division.feel/face a squeeze A ​series of ​reports last week suggests that ​financialinstitutions will ​feel the squeeze on their ​balance sheets well into next ​year.
(Definition of squeeze from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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