Meaning of “stable” in the English Dictionary

"stable" in British English

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stableadjective

uk /ˈsteɪ.bəl/ us /ˈsteɪ.bəl/

C1 firmly fixed or not likely to move or change:

If the foundations of the house aren't stable, collapse is possible.
After several part-time jobs, he's now got a stable job in a bank.
The hospital said she was in a stable condition (= not likely to get worse) following the operation.

C1 A stable person is mentally healthy:

She seems more stable these days.

specialized chemistry A stable substance keeps the same chemical or atomic state.

More examples

  • The economy is fairly stable.
  • House prices have been reasonably stable these past few years.
  • Most children need the security of a stable family life.
  • He's been taken to hospital where his condition is described as serious but stable.
  • I'm just happy to see him in a stable relationship.

stablenoun [ C ]

uk /ˈsteɪ.bəl/ us /ˈsteɪ.bəl/

C2 a building in which horses are kept

a group of racehorses that are owned or trained by one person

a group of people who perform a similar activity and who are trained by the same person or employed by the same organization:

During the 1950s, Sun Records' stable of singers included Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis.

stableverb [ T ]

uk /ˈsteɪ.bəl/ us /ˈsteɪ.bəl/

(Definition of “stable” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stable" in American English

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stableadjective

us /ˈsteɪ·bəl/

stable adjective (FIXED)

firmly fixed or not likely to move or change:

Don’t climb the ladder until you’re sure it’s stable.
She’s in the hospital in stable condition.
The country needs a stable government that is free of corruption.

stablenoun [ C ]

us /ˈsteɪ·bəl/

stable noun [ C ] (BUILDING)

a building in which horses or cattle are kept:

The horses in the stable have plenty of straw.

(Definition of “stable” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"stable" in Business English

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stableadjective

uk /ˈsteɪbl/ us

ECONOMICS, POLITICS a stable economy, country, system, etc. is able to continue in a regular and successful way without unexpected changes:

a stable economy/country/government
The company must now focus on operating a more efficient and stable supply chain.
stable jobs/employment A proposed merger has resulted in key staff quitting in order to find more stable jobs.

ECONOMICS, FINANCE stable prices or rates do not change much:

stable prices/currencies/rates The mortgage rate cut created more stable house prices.
The rouble is stable and public finances are looking remarkably healthy.
remain/stay stable We have experienced high growth recently, with the unemployment rate remaining extremely stable at 2.9%.

(Definition of “stable” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)