stake Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “stake” in the English Dictionary

"stake" in British English

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stakenoun [C]

uk   us   /steɪk/
  • stake noun [C] (SHARE)

a share or a ​financialinvolvement in something such as a ​business: He holds (= ​owns) a 40 ​percent stake in/of the ​company.have a stake in sth If you have a stake in something, it is ​important to you because you have a ​personalinterest or ​involvement in it: Employers have a stake in the ​training of ​theirstaff.

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  • stake noun [C] (RISK)

the ​amount of ​money that you ​risk on the ​result of something such as a ​game or ​competition: She ​spent two ​weeks in Las Vegas ​playing high-stakes ​blackjack at the ​casinos.the stakes [plural] In an ​activity or ​competition, the stakes are the ​reward for the ​person who ​wins or ​succeeds in it: The ​team is ​playing for ​enormous stakes - the ​chance to ​play in the ​final.the Stakes used in the ​names of ​horseraces in which the ​prizemoney is ​provided by all the ​owners of the ​horses that are ​competing in the ​racethe beauty, popularity, etc. stakes a ​situation where someone is ​judged on how much of a ​particularquality they have: The ​primeminister is not very high in the ​popularity stakes (= he is not very ​popular) at the ​moment.raise/up the stakes to ​increase the ​prize or ​reward in a ​competition or any ​activity in which you are ​competing to make a ​situation more ​urgent or more ​difficult to ​ignore: The ​stowaways are ​trying to ​raise the stakes by ​refusing to ​eat until they are given ​money and ​aid.

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  • stake noun [C] (STICK)

a ​strongstick or ​metalbar with a ​pointed end: The stakes are ​pushed or ​hammered into the ​ground and can be used for ​supporting a ​plant or ​formingpart of a ​fence.the stake in the past, a ​woodenpost to which ​people were ​tied before being ​burned to ​death as a ​punishment: In ​medievalEurope, many women were ​accused of being ​witches and were burned at the stake.

stakeverb [T]

uk   us   /steɪk/
(Definition of stake from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stake" in American English

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stakenoun [C]

 us   /steɪk/
  • stake noun [C] (SHARE)

a ​share in something, esp. a ​financialshare in a ​business, or an ​emotionalinvestment in something: He ​holds a 20% stake in the ​company. Parents have a ​large stake in ​their children’s ​education. In an ​activity or ​competition, the stakes are the ​costs or ​risksinvolved in ​competing: Global ​competition has ​raised the stakes of doing ​business.
  • stake noun [C] (RISK)

the ​amount of ​money that you ​risk on the ​result of a ​game or ​competition: Almost everyone has a stake in the ​globaleconomy these ​days.
  • stake noun [C] (POLE)

a ​thick, ​strong, ​pointedwood or ​metalpolepushed into the ​ground and used to ​mark a ​spot or to ​support something: Stakes in the ​groundmarked the ​outline of the new ​building.
Idioms

stakeverb [T]

 us   /steɪk/
  • stake verb [T] (RISK)

to ​risk harming or ​losing something ​important: He has ​talent and ​ambition, and I’d stake my ​reputation on his ​success.
  • stake verb [T] (FASTEN TO POLE)

to ​fasten something to a stake: Tomato ​plants should be staked ​soon after they are ​planted.
(Definition of stake from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"stake" in Business English

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stakenoun

uk   us   /steɪk/
[C, usually singular] FINANCE the ​amount that someone has ​invested in a ​company, often ​expressed as a ​percentage of the ​total sharecapital (= ​moneyinvested in a ​business in the ​form of ​shares): a 15%/3%/10%, etc. stake His 22% stake makes him the retailer's biggest ​shareholder.have/hold/own a stake (in sth) The Chief Executive has a controlling stake in the ​companyworth €58m. acquire/​buy/​sell a stake (in sth) increase/​raise/​reduce a stake (in sth)
have a stake in sth if you have a stake in something, its ​success or ​failure will have an ​effect on you: All three ​officials have a ​personal stake in the President's re-election as it would ​allow them to ​keep their ​jobs.
stakes [plural] the ​amount of ​money you ​risklosing by guessing the ​result of something wrongly: The City continued to play for high stakes in ​shares of the ​airline. in a ​businessactivity, the stakes are the ​level of ​risk and possible ​profit involved: Given the high stakes for both ​hardwaremakers and ​softwaresuppliers, neither ​side is likely to give up easily.
at stake if something like ​money, a ​job, or someone's ​reputation is at stake, it is in danger of being ​lost because of a particular ​situation: The company's reputation is at stake and they need to ​act quickly and decisively. Up to 300 ​jobs are ​thought to be at stake at ​headoffice.

stakeverb [T]

uk   us   /steɪk/
stake a/your claim to ​state that you have a ​right to something and that it should belong to you: Foreign ​companies across a ​range of ​sectorsseek to stake a ​claim in China's fast-growing ​economy.stake a claim to/for/on sth Various countries are ​trying to stake their ​claims to the ​oil under the polar ice ​cap.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of stake from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “stake”
in Spanish poste…
in Vietnamese cọc…
in Malaysian pancang pagar…
in Thai เสาหลัก…
in French pieu…
in German der Pfahl…
in Chinese (Simplified) 份额, 股本,股份…
in Turkish hisse, pay, kazık…
in Russian доля (в компании), кол, столб…
in Indonesian pancang…
in Chinese (Traditional) 份額, 股本,股份…
in Polish udział, słup…
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“stake” in Business English

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