standby Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “standby” in the English Dictionary

"standby" in British English

See all translations

standbynoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈstænd.baɪ/ (plural standbys)

standby noun [C] (READY)

something that is always ​ready for use, ​especially if a ​regular one ​fails: Board ​games are a good standby to ​keep the ​childrenamused if the ​weather is ​bad. There are standby ​generators but these usually only have to ​work for a few ​hours a ​year during ​powercuts.on standby When a ​person or a thing is on standby, they are ​ready to be used if ​necessary: Hospitals are on standby ​ready to ​deal with ​casualties from the ​crash.

standby noun [C] (TICKET)

(also standby ticket) a ​cheapticketsold just before a ​flight or a ​performance if there is a ​seatavailable
(Definition of standby from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"standby" in American English

See all translations

standbynoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈstændˌbɑɪ/ (plural standbys)
something ​available for use when ​needed, or the ​state of being ​ready for use: I have several ​meals I use as standbys for ​unexpectedcompany. Cary also has ​sought to put more ​contractors on standby for ​majorstorms. If you ​fly standby, you ​hold a ​ticket and are ​ready to ​travel when ​spacebecomesavailable on a ​flight.
Idioms
(Definition of standby from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"standby" in Business English

See all translations

standbynoun [C]

(plural standbys) (also stand-by) uk   us   /ˈstændbaɪ/
a ​person or thing that is ​available and that can be used when necessary, if another ​person or thing is not ​available, or in an ​emergency: They ​manufactureportableGPSsystems which can be used as an ​emergency standby.
(also standby ticket) TRANSPORT a ​cheapticketsold just before a ​flight or a ​performance if there is a ​seatavailable
fly standby TRANSPORT to ​travel by ​plane using a ​ticket that cannot be ​bought in ​advance, but that becomes ​available just before the ​plane is ​due to ​leave: Employees at some ​airlines can ​fly for ​free if they ​fly standby.
on standby ready to be used or to do something if necessary: They have 700 gritters and ​snow ploughs on ​24-hour standby in ​order to prepare for the ​freezing temperatures.leave sth on standby You should make sure that ​electricalgoods are not ​left on standby, because it ​wastesenergy.remain/be put on standby Economists are remaining on standby for the all-important ​employmentreport for August. TRANSPORT a ​person who is on standby is ​ready to ​travel on a ​plane immediately if a ​ticket becomes ​available: The ​salesmenbook the ​cheapestflight they can ​find on the day they want to ​fly, then go to wait on standby for the ​flight they really want to get aboard.

standbyadjective [before noun]

(also stand-by) uk   us   /ˈstændbaɪ/
ready to be used if necessary: a standby ​generator If the ​computer is ​left undisturbed for five ​minutes, it goes into standby ​mode. The ​phoneoffers up to four ​hours of ​talktime and 106 ​hours of standby ​time.
ECONOMICS relating to ​extramoney that a country can ​borrow from the International Monetary Fund if it has serious ​financial difficulties: a standby ​agreement/​arrangement/​loan standby ​credit
sold just before a ​flight or a ​performance if there is a ​seatavailable: a standby ​flight/​seat
(Definition of standby from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of standby?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
faith school

a school that is financially supported by a particular religious group, usually for children from that religion

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More